Tag: west bengal

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

Rui Mach (Rohu Fish) is probably the only fish that is available in abundance anywhere in India and my Bengali heart thanks the suppliers for that. This is the frequently bought fish in my home and I actually love to cook it in different ways […]

 
Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

Kajoli Mach, also known as Gangetic Ailia, is a fresh water fish and belongs to the catfish family. This fish is typically available and popular in Indian subcontinent. This fish is relatively small and cooked whole in various delectable forms. Happen to be one of […]

 
Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

Homemade sandesh (fudge) is pure nostalgia. Any festival or any occasion, sandesh is a must almost in every Bengali household. We make variety of sandesh that includes narkoler sandesh (coconut fudge), chhanar sandesh (cottage cheese fudge) and khirer sandesh. Sandesh is not actually something that I am mad about, but, have grown up seeing sandesh making at home and this has always been a family favourite. I am more of a Rosogolla person than Sandesh.

Find More Festival Sweet Recipes Here

Since I have moved from my hometown, this is the first time I have made sandesh. Many a times I thought of making it but dropped the plan as I could not find proper traditional moulds. One of the main reasons why I love making sandesh is the beautiful moulds. Finally, I bought a bunch of moulds couple of months back when I visited home 🙂 Today’s Khirer Sandesh is the outcome of these beautiful stone moulds. And yes, don’t worry if you don’t have the mould, you can still make sandesh. The moulds enhance beauty and don’t actually make any difference in the taste.

Sandesh Moulds

My love for making sweets is eternal and yes, I have been making many traditional Bengali sweets since childhood with my Pishimoni. The process of making Khirer Sandesh is not that tough, but, needs much patience. It takes hours to reduce the milk itself and then needs quite an expert hand to make sandesh out of those hot reduced milk. Whether you add any extra ingredient for flavour is completely upto you, otherwise, milk and sugar are enough to get those perfect sandesh.

This is the bunch that I have prepared for the upcoming Lokkhi Puja. Khirer Sandesh can be easily kept for 5 days and don’t need any refrigeration. But, if you stay in a very hot and humid place, some extra measures may need to be taken. It’s better not to store then in refrigerator as it will make the sandesh too hard and will affect the taste as well. Please note that with the below mentioned ingredients you should get approx 25 pieces. With that said, let me give you the recipe here.

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litre full fat milk
  • 1 cup powdered sugar

Method:

  • Heat the milk and reduce to make khoya. Do it by constantly stirring on low to medium flame. It may take 1.5 to 2 hours.
  • Just before the milk gets completely reduced, add powdered sugar portion by portion and mix very properly. Check for the lumps and mix well.
  • To check if the milk is properly done, take out a little portion and cool it down. Now, try making ball with the same and if it is not sticking in your hand, it’s done.
  • Rub a tray with ghee and quickly transfer the reduced milk on the tray.
  • Rub all your moulds (or single mould) with ghee.
  • Now, rub little oil in your hand and take small portion of the reduced milk and make ball with the help of your palm. Press it on the mould and with your fingers, adjust the edges. Pull out lightly from the mould and keep on a separate tray.
  • Repeat the process to make the whole bunch.
  • Let the sandesh cool down completely and it’s done.

You can serve sandesh immediately or can store for few days. This is a traditional Bengali fudge and any time is a good time to have this.

Do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 

 
Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

With the advent of festive season many new flowers bloom, many new crops grow, our hearts deck up with new hopes and dreams and not to mention our kitchens – they just keep of spreading new aromas. There are actually some dishes which we specifically […]

 
Doi diye Alur Dom (Bengali Style Dum Alu with Yogurt) – Thakurbarir Ranna

Doi diye Alur Dom (Bengali Style Dum Alu with Yogurt) – Thakurbarir Ranna

……….উদয়দিগন্তে শঙ্খ বাজে, মোর চিত্তমাঝে চিরনূতনেরে দিল ডাক পঁচিশে বৈশাখ ।। With the advent of Pochise Baisakh, the birthday of Kobiguru Rabindranath Tagore, here I present another great recipe from the kitchen of Tagores. I take immense pleasure to add another gem to my Thakurbarir […]

 
Aam Pora Shorbot / Bengali Aam Panna (Bengali Style Roasted Mango Summer Cooler)

Aam Pora Shorbot / Bengali Aam Panna (Bengali Style Roasted Mango Summer Cooler)

Aam Pora Shorbot is a very popular Bengali summer cooler and is made by roasting raw mango. The flavour of roasted mango mingles with the flavour of freshly chopped pudina pata (mint leaves) and creates something that is ultimate refreshing and cools you down instantly. In most Bengali households, during summer, this is served as a welcome drink to the guests. Also, one can have it before or after meal. This drink is absolutely amazing to keep you hydrated and gives an instant energy boost.

See Other Summer Beverage Recipes Here

During summer, Aam Pora Shorbot is my family favourite and I make it very often. Always served chilled, my family always prefers it over any store-bought soft drink. And why not? This traditional drink is probably the best summer cooler one can ever have.

The process of making Aam Pora Shorbot varies from person to person. Some prefer it without mint or with very less mint. But, I always prefer it with mint and with some very basic ingredients, like roasted cumin seeds and black salt. Too much of spices can suppress the flavour of mango and I don’t want that. A little tangy, a little sweet and a little spicy – this drink is complete bliss. This is how I make my Aam Pora Shorbot.

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium sized raw mango
  • 1 tea-spoon roasted cumin seeds
  • 1 tea-spoon black salt
  • 4 table-spoon sugar (adjust according to your taste)
  • 2 cup chilled water
  • as required ice cubes

Method:

  • Crush the roasted cumin seeds to powder and keep aside.
  • Roast the mangoes directly over the stove top until the skin turns completely black in colour. Remove and let them cool down completely.
  • Peel off the burnt skin of the mangoes and extract the pulp. Discard the seed.
  • Take the pulp, cumin seeds powder, black salt, sugar and water in a blender and grind until smooth.
  • Pour in serving glasses and add ice cubes. Serve chilled.

Aam Pora Shorbot should always be served chilled. You can also store it in a glass jar or bottle and keep in the refrigerator for 2/3 days. Please note that with the above mentioned ingredients you should get 4 glasses of Aam Pora Shorbot.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali summer drink and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Summer people!!!

 
Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Often cooked with Golda Chingri (jumbo prawn), this malaikari or malai curry can be cooked equally well with small or medium sized prawn as well. This is a royal and rich dish with coconut milk that plays the trick. This dish is creamy and flavorful and […]

 
Tetul diye Cholar Dal (Split Chickpeas with Tamarind)

Tetul diye Cholar Dal (Split Chickpeas with Tamarind)

এ জগতে, হায়, সেই বেশি চায় আছে যার ভূরি ভূরি– রাজার হস্ত করে সমস্ত কাঙালের ধন চুরি। The above mentioned lines are from Rabindranath Thakur’s “দুই বিঘা জমি” (Dui Bigha Jomi). No, these lines have nothing to do with my today’s recipe. Then why these […]

 
Chhanar Jilapi / Bengali Style Cottage Cheese Jalebi

Chhanar Jilapi / Bengali Style Cottage Cheese Jalebi

On a hot summer afternoon, Maa just put a pan full of milk on the stove top to let it boil. Soon after Maa literally screamed in anguish “issh, sob dudh fete gelo…bhebechilam payesh banabo…sob dudh fete gelo” (thought of making rice pudding today but alas, the milk got curdled). This sometimes happen during summer. You just want to boil the milk and it gets curdled. Maa gets annoyed very easily when these things happen. She went on saying “dhur ajker ranna o sesh, chhana ta rekhe dei, kalke chhanar dalna baniye nebo” (I done with the day’s cooking. I will better keep the chhana today and tomorrow I will make Chhanar Dalna). Pishimoni smiled and said “chhana ta amake dao, ami bacchader jonne mishti baniye debo” (give the cheese to make, I will make sweets for the kids). Maa replied “issh tumio paro, tomar shotti dhorjo ache go” (you truly have patience).

See Other Bengali Sweet Recipes Here

Hearing of mishti (sweet), the next scene was me and my sister running after Pishimoni and poking her “chhana diye ki banabe?” (what will you prepare with the cheese). Pishimoni smiled at us and said “chhanar jilapi khabi? khele baniye debo” (will you eat chhanar jilapi? if yes, I will make it for you). We both the sisters were like “ha khabo, ha khabo…ekhoni banao” (yes yes…make now only). Pishimoni set with the cheese and started kneading it with other required ingredients and said “bhalokore dekhe shikhe nao, boro hole nije banate parbe” (see how I make it and learn properly…you can make by yourself when you grow up). Both of us set in front of her and started observing the process very minutely. Honestly speaking, we were not that much into learning, but, waiting her to finish early so that we can start gulping 😛

After that day, this sweet often used to be on our demand list whenever we used to visit Pishimoni’s place or she used to come over. We often used to finish it in one go. Maa is not that much into sweets, but, Baba used to accompany us. Time passed by and we grew up. Pishimoni is no more. I sometime make Chhanar Jilapi and whenever I do, I remember Pishimoni. She was a magician with God gifted culinary skills. Baba often say that I make better sweets than Maa and I have the traits of Pishimoni in me. Whatever I have learned from Pishimoni, I treasure everything close to my heart.

Coming to Chhanar Jilapi, this is a traditional Bengali sweet which is made of cottage cheese. This is a deep fried, melt-in-mouth cottage cheese knot that gets its sweet taste after being immersed in a runny sugar syrup. It can be served both hot and cold, though, hot is always what I prefer. With very few ingredients, this sweet tastes heavenly and is not that tough to make.

Bengali New Year aka Poila Boishakh is arriving and like many other Bengali houses, my house decked up with new decorations and my kitchen with some sweets and non vegetarian preparations. Today I made Chhanar Jilapi for some friends who came over. This is definitely going to be on my Poila Boishakh party menu as well. Here’s the recipe for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 1 litre full fat milk
  • 3 table-spoon lemon juice
  • 2 table-spoon maida (all purpose flour)
  • 1 table-spoon sooji (samolina)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon baking powder
  • 2 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch saffron soaked in 1 table-spoon warm milk
  • 2 cup sugar
  • 3.5 cup water
  • as required oil or ghee for deep frying (you can mix both in equal proportion)

Method:

Making Chhana (cottage cheese)

  • In a pan, heat the milk and bring it to boil. Turn off the flame.
  • Immediately, add lime juice and mix. You will observe that water starts separating from the fat. Your Chhana (cottage cheese) is done. Let it cool down.
  • Drain the water to get the chhana. Pour the chhana on a cotton cloth and squeeze to drain the excess water.
  • To completely drain the water away, tie the cloth and hand for atleast 1 hour.

Making Chhanae Jilapi

  • Take the chhana in a mixing bowl and knead to a soft and smooth dough.
  • Now, add maida, baking powder, sooji, salt and the saffron soaked milk. Knead the entire thing properly for 10-15 minutes to a soft and smooth dough. Once it does not stick to your hand, the dough is ready.
  • Remember, kneading is the key. The more you knead, the more soft and smooth your jilapi will be. Once
  • Cover the dough with a cloth and let it rest for 30 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, in a heavy bottom pan, heat water and add sugar. Heat it constantly in high flame until the sugar gets dissolved, water gets reduced and the syrup comes to 1 string.
  • Once the syrup is done, keep it aside and let it cool down a little bit.
  • Now, take the chhana dough and cut small balls from it. The given quantity of ingredients should give you 7-8 pieces of jilapi.
  • With the help of your palm, roll out long ropes out of the chhana balls and swirl them in circular jilapi (jalebi) pattern.
  • Now, heat oil ghee (or both mixed together) in a pan and deep fry the jilapis until they turn reddish brown.
  • Pour the hot jilapis immediately to the syrup once they are fried.
  • Soak the jilapis in syrup for atleast and hour or so. Your Chhanar Jilapi is ready to be served.

You can consume them immediately or can store them in refrigerator for 2-3 days. But, Chhanar Jilapi always tastes when served hot.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali delicacy and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy eating!

 
Echorer Dalna / Kancha Kathaler Torkari (Bengali Style Raw Jackfruit Curry)

Echorer Dalna / Kancha Kathaler Torkari (Bengali Style Raw Jackfruit Curry)

Echorer Dalna or Kancha Kathaler Torkari is my summer favourite dish. Kancha Kathal (raw jackfruit) is also called “gach patha” (tree goat) in Bengali as, if cooked to perfection, the taste can actually substitute mutton. One must try it to believe it. Though, it can […]