Tag: traditional recipe

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

Rui Mach (Rohu Fish) is probably the only fish that is available in abundance anywhere in India and my Bengali heart thanks the suppliers for that. This is the frequently bought fish in my home and I actually love to cook it in different ways […]

 
Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

Kajoli Mach, also known as Gangetic Ailia, is a fresh water fish and belongs to the catfish family. This fish is typically available and popular in Indian subcontinent. This fish is relatively small and cooked whole in various delectable forms. Happen to be one of […]

 
Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

With the advent of festive season many new flowers bloom, many new crops grow, our hearts deck up with new hopes and dreams and not to mention our kitchens – they just keep of spreading new aromas. There are actually some dishes which we specifically chose to prepare during festival times or they are kind of mandatory with festivals knocking at the door. Niramish Mangsho aka Bhoger Mangsho is one such dish for me that I love to cook at this time of the year.

See Other Mutton Recipes Here

Mangsho (here, not chicken, but mutton) is specifically cooked with onion, garlic and lot of spices. But this Bengali Niramish Mangsho is different. Niramish means vegetarian in Bengali and this mutton curry is considered to be vegetarian as it does not contain onion and garlic. Surprised? Yes, this is how Bengali food logic works. Typically prepared to offer Goddess Kali, this mutton curry is a quintessential Bengali delicacy and is made absolutely without onion and garlic. Also, the use of spices are kept minimum and the taste enhancement completely depends on “getting maximum out of minimum” skill and ofcourse the devotion of the person who is making it.

Earlier, when boli (animal sacrifice) was legalized, people used to prepare this curry with the meat of the lamb/sheep that had been sacrificed to Goddess Kali. Now, when boli ritual is almost a history, people still purchase mutton (yes, from the market) to make this special mutton curry and to offer it to the Goddess. The food that we offer to God is called Bhog and thus another name of this curry came into being, Bhoger Mangsho.

Niramish Mangsho is such a dish which is typically not prepared in many households, rather, it is the thing of parar barowari puja (refers to such pujas where a large number of people gathers together to organise a puja). However, it also gets prepared in barir puja (a family organised puja). Apart from cooking this heavenly tasty curry only for Goddess, we the Bengalis also love to prepare this sometime just like that, for our family. I am one such Bengali who love to cook this mangsho sometime and my favourite time to cook it is this time of the year.

Niramish Mangsho was on last Sunday afternoon menu and my family loved it. The tender pieces of mutton cooked in ghee and a dash of gobindobhog rice (a special Bengali aromatic rice) paste – this curry is a blast of flavour and aroma. Let’s have a look at its recipe. I am sure you are going to fall in love with this mutton curry.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm curry cut mutton
  • 2 potato, largely diced 
  • 3-4 tablespoon gobindobhog rice
  • 3 tablespoon mustard oil
  • 4 table-spoon ghee
  • 1 tablespoon garam masala powder
  • 3 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste

For Marination:

  • 3/4 cup yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon red chilli powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 tablespoon ginger paste
  • 1 tablespoon green chilli paste (adjust as per your tolerance)
  • 1 tablespoon mustard oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt

For Tempering:

  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch)
  • 1 black cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seed
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seed

Method:

  • Wash and marinate the mutton pieces for 2 hours with all the ingredients mentioned in For Marination section.
  • Soak the gobindobhog rice for 1 hour in water and then make a fine paste of it. Keep aside.
  • Heat mustard oil in a pan and shallow fry the potato adding little turmeric powder and salt. Remove and keep aside.
  • Now, heat ghee and temper with all the ingredients mentioned in For Tempering section. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add the marinated mutton and stir in medium flame until the ghee starts separating.
  • Add fried potato and required salt and give a quick mix.
  • Now, add water and mix well. Cover the lid and cook for around 30-40 minutes in low to medium flame. Stir in between if required. If using a pressure cooker, cook for 6 whistles and turn off the flame. Let the pressure cool down naturally.
  • Open the lid and check if the mutton is properly cooked. If not, cover and cook for some more time.
  • Once the mutton is nicely done, add gobindobhog rice paste and mix very well. Cover the lid and cook for another 5 minutes in low flame.
  • Open the lid and add garam masala powder. Give a quick mix.
  • Your Niramish Mangsho aka Bhoger Mangsho is ready to be served now.

Serve this dish with gorom bhat (piping hot rice) and yes, don’t forget a squeeze a piece of lemon before you eat. This Niramish Mangsho is a sure shot heat winning recipe and you must give it a try.

Enjoy this delicious mutton curry and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating and Happy Festivity to you all!!!

 
Doi diye Alur Dom (Bengali Style Dum Alu with Yogurt) – Thakurbarir Ranna

Doi diye Alur Dom (Bengali Style Dum Alu with Yogurt) – Thakurbarir Ranna

……….উদয়দিগন্তে শঙ্খ বাজে, মোর চিত্তমাঝে চিরনূতনেরে দিল ডাক পঁচিশে বৈশাখ ।। With the advent of Pochise Baisakh, the birthday of Kobiguru Rabindranath Tagore, here I present another great recipe from the kitchen of Tagores. I take immense pleasure to add another gem to my Thakurbarir […]

 
Aam Pora Shorbot / Bengali Aam Panna (Bengali Style Roasted Mango Summer Cooler)

Aam Pora Shorbot / Bengali Aam Panna (Bengali Style Roasted Mango Summer Cooler)

Aam Pora Shorbot is a very popular Bengali summer cooler and is made by roasting raw mango. The flavour of roasted mango mingles with the flavour of freshly chopped pudina pata (mint leaves) and creates something that is ultimate refreshing and cools you down instantly. […]

 
Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Often cooked with Golda Chingri (jumbo prawn), this malaikari or malai curry can be cooked equally well with small or medium sized prawn as well. This is a royal and rich dish with coconut milk that plays the trick. This dish is creamy and flavorful and goes fantastically well with gorom bhat (steamed rice). The mild yet rich taste of this curry happened to be the hot favourite of Britishers as well. Since the spiciness is drastically mellowed down with coconut milk, this dish does not taste as hot and spicy as any other typical Bengali dish.

See Other Prawn Recipes Here

It is said that chingri mach (prawn or shrimp) is for Ghoti (origin of West Bengal) and Ilish or Hilsha is for Bangal (origin of East Bengal). But this is not true always. I, being a hardcore Bangal, is a die-heart fan of chingri mach. I love chingri mach in any form or on any day and every day. Though, words fall short when I describe my love for Ilish mach, but, I love chingri as well.

“Malai” actually means “cream”, but, this dish does not contain any cream rather than the creamy coconut milk. It is said that this dish has its origin in Malaysia and the term “malai” is actually “malay” of Malaysia. This is a traditional dish and often cooked in Bengali weddings and festivals. Though this curry can be prepared with any type of prawn, but, the most preferred are large and medium sized prawn. Pishimoni used to add grated coconut in this curry while Maa cooks it only with coconut milk. I like Maa‘s version more and thus, I always cook it the way Maa does. Also, I have seen Maa using posto bata (poppy seed paste) and thus, I follow the same.

Today, I made this amazing dish on my sister’s demand and as usual, she loved it. You can make this curry with or without gravy. Adjust the water accordingly. I like it with gravy and thus used a little more water while making it. With that said, here’s the recipe of Chingri Macher Malaikari for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm prawn (jumbo or medium)
  • 1 cup (200 ml approx) coconut milk
  • 3 table-spoon posto bata (poppy seed paste)
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 6 green chillies, slitted from middle (adjust according to your tolerance)
  • 1 tea-spoon ginger paste
  • 1 tea-spoon garlic paste
  • 1.5 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1 + 1/2)
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon red chilli powder (optional)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon garam masala powder
  • as required oil (any oil) to fry the prawns
  • 3 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 1 table-spoon ghee
  • 1.5 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste

For Tempering:

  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch)
  • 4 cardamom, crushed
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 javitri

Method:

  • Cut the prawns keeping the head and tail intact. However, the choice is all yours. If you want you can discard these parts.
  • Wash and rub the prawns with 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Marinate for 30 minutes.
  • Heat oil in a pan and fry the prawns until they turn golden yellow. Remove and keep aside.
  • Now, heat mustard oil and ghee together in a pan and temper with the ingredients mentioned in For Tempering section. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add chopped onion and sautè until it turns golden brown. (Tips: while sauteing the onion, add few pinches of salt or sugar to make it brown fast).
  • Now, add ginger-garlic paste, 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder, coriander powder, cumin powder, red chilli powder, Kashmiri red chilli powder and required salt. Sprinkle a little water and stir for 3 minutes on low flame or until you stop getting the raw smell of the spices.
  • Add posto bata and mix well.
  • Add warm water and cover the lid. On a medium flame, bring it to a boil.
  • Now, add the fried prawns and give a quick stir.
  • Add coconut milk and again, mix well. Cover the lid and lower the flame. On a low to medium flame, cook for 10-15 minutes or until the prawns are done properly. Do not overcook the prawns.
  • Open the lid and sprinkle garam masala powder. Turn off the flame.
  • Your Chingri Macher Malaikari is ready to be served now.

If you wish you can garnish it with 1 table-spoon fresh coconut milk just before serving. Serve this dish with piping hot rice. I have seen people eating this with roti/chapatti, though, I don’t recommend it. This goes best only with gorom bhat.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali delicacy and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 

 
Tetul diye Cholar Dal (Split Chickpeas with Tamarind)

Tetul diye Cholar Dal (Split Chickpeas with Tamarind)

এ জগতে, হায়, সেই বেশি চায় আছে যার ভূরি ভূরি– রাজার হস্ত করে সমস্ত কাঙালের ধন চুরি। The above mentioned lines are from Rabindranath Thakur’s “দুই বিঘা জমি” (Dui Bigha Jomi). No, these lines have nothing to do with my today’s recipe. Then why these […]

 
Chhanar Jilapi / Bengali Style Cottage Cheese Jalebi

Chhanar Jilapi / Bengali Style Cottage Cheese Jalebi

On a hot summer afternoon, Maa just put a pan full of milk on the stove top to let it boil. Soon after Maa literally screamed in anguish “issh, sob dudh fete gelo…bhebechilam payesh banabo…sob dudh fete gelo” (thought of making rice pudding today but […]

 
Echorer Dalna / Kancha Kathaler Torkari (Bengali Style Raw Jackfruit Curry)

Echorer Dalna / Kancha Kathaler Torkari (Bengali Style Raw Jackfruit Curry)

Echorer Dalna or Kancha Kathaler Torkari is my summer favourite dish. Kancha Kathal (raw jackfruit) is also called “gach patha” (tree goat) in Bengali as, if cooked to perfection, the taste can actually substitute mutton. One must try it to believe it. Though, it can be cooked in vegetarian version as well, but, the mutton taste can be brought only if it is cooked in non vegetarian way. Here I want to mention that for Bengalis, anything that contains onion or garlic or both is considered to be non vegetarian.

Echorer Dalna is an age old recipe where “echor” is referred to as green unripe jackfruit. This is a must have dish in our house during summer, specially, around Bengali New Year. Maa cooks awesome Echorer Dalna and we all are madly in love with this dish. As a kid whenever I used to act oversmart, Maa used to call me “echore paka”. This is a very flamous Bengali saying which means a raw jackfruit has ripened before age. Such is the significance of “echor” in a Bong’s life 😀

Naboborsho aka Poila Boishakh aka Bengali New Year is arriving and Echorer Dalna has a significant place in order to mark this occasion. Few of my non Bengali friends asked me about what exactly we do in our new year. I actually took a long pause as I don’t recognize of doing anything else rather than eating. So I replied – we eat and only eat. Yes, we also do wear new cloths, but, mostly and mainly We Eat.

This year, to start my eating extravaganza, I have prepared Echorer Dalna exactly as Maa does. This recipe is almost same as Bengali Style Mutton Curry, just instead of mutton I have used raw jackfruit. Also, the taste and texture is almost same as mutton curry. Though the process of cutting raw jackfruit is tedious and tricky, but all hard work seems to be worthy when you have the final outcome. Oh, I love it so much with gorom gorom bhat (piping hot rice). Here’s the recipe for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm echor, cut into cubes
  • 1 big potato, diced
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1 big onion, finely chopped
  • 5 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 2 whole garlic (cut the root and shoot part)
  • 1 table-spoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 1.5 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1/2 + 1/2 + 1/2)
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon garam masala powder
  • as required mustard oil to fry the veggies 
  • salt, according to taste
  • 3 cup warm water

For Tempering:

  • 3 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch approx)
  • 5 green cardamom
  • 5 cloves 
  • 1 jaiphal
  • 2 star anise 
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin seeds

Method:

  • Wash the echor properly and boil in hot water for 15-20 minutes. Do not cover the vessel with lid while boiling, keep it open.
  • Discard the water and keep the echor aside.
  • Heat oil in a pan and shallow fry the potato by adding 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and salt. Remove and keep aside.
  • Heat oil again and shallow fry the boiled echor by adding 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Remove and keep aside.
  • Now, for tempering, heat 3 table-spoon mustard oil and temper with the ingredients mentioned in For Tempering section. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add onion and sautè until it turns light golden brown.
  • Add ginger-garlic paste, remaining turmeric powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, Kashmiri red chilli powder and salt. Sprinkle some water and stir fry the masala for 3 minutes.
  • Now, add chopped tomato and stir until it gets blended.
  • Add potato, whole garlic and echor. Give the whole thing a proper mix.
  • Add water and cover the lid. On a low to medium flame, cook it for 25 minutes or until the veggies are nicely done.
  • If you want more gravy then just add some more warm water and bring to a boil and also, cook for 5 minutes after that.
  • Once the veggies are done and you have your required gravy, sprinkle the garam masala and give a quick mix.
  • Turn the flame off and your Echorer Dalna is ready to be served now.

Serve this awesome and authentic Bengali dish with bhat (steamed rice) and don’t forget to squeeze a piece of gondhoraj lebu (lemon). It also goes very well with roti/chapatti/paratha.

Do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks. Sobike janai Shubho Naboborsher Antorik Shubbhecha! (Wishing everyone a very Happy Bengali New Year).

Happy Eating!!!

 
Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

“Mache Bhate Bangali” (Bengalis by fish and rice) is a saying which is as true as “The Sun Rises in the East”. We have a kind of relation with fish which is beyond just loving it for our meals. For us, fish is not only […]