Tag: lunch

Dimer Jhuri Torkari (Scrambled Egg Curry)

Dimer Jhuri Torkari (Scrambled Egg Curry)

They say “Sunday ho ya Monday, roz khao aande” and I follow them. My family has the custom of not saying no to eggs. My husband loves egg and can choose egg over any dish, any day. I often cook egg curry and try to […]

 
Hansher Dim Kosha (Bengali Style Duck Egg Spicy Curry)

Hansher Dim Kosha (Bengali Style Duck Egg Spicy Curry)

Hansher Dim Kosha has always been my hot favourite and it’s such a dish which is actually close to my heart as it reminds me of Pishimoni. Among all the other awesome dishes the genius lady used to cook, this dish in particular had been […]

 
Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Often cooked with Golda Chingri (jumbo prawn), this malaikari or malai curry can be cooked equally well with small or medium sized prawn as well. This is a royal and rich dish with coconut milk that plays the trick. This dish is creamy and flavorful and goes fantastically well with gorom bhat (steamed rice). The mild yet rich taste of this curry happened to be the hot favourite of Britishers as well. Since the spiciness is drastically mellowed down with coconut milk, this dish does not taste as hot and spicy as any other typical Bengali dish.

See Other Prawn Recipes Here

It is said that chingri mach (prawn or shrimp) is for Ghoti (origin of West Bengal) and Ilish or Hilsha is for Bangal (origin of East Bengal). But this is not true always. I, being a hardcore Bangal, is a die-heart fan of chingri mach. I love chingri mach in any form or on any day and every day. Though, words fall short when I describe my love for Ilish mach, but, I love chingri as well.

“Malai” actually means “cream”, but, this dish does not contain any cream rather than the creamy coconut milk. It is said that this dish has its origin in Malaysia and the term “malai” is actually “malay” of Malaysia. This is a traditional dish and often cooked in Bengali weddings and festivals. Though this curry can be prepared with any type of prawn, but, the most preferred are large and medium sized prawn. Pishimoni used to add grated coconut in this curry while Maa cooks it only with coconut milk. I like Maa‘s version more and thus, I always cook it the way Maa does. Also, I have seen Maa using posto bata (poppy seed paste) and thus, I follow the same.

Today, I made this amazing dish on my sister’s demand and as usual, she loved it. You can make this curry with or without gravy. Adjust the water accordingly. I like it with gravy and thus used a little more water while making it. With that said, here’s the recipe of Chingri Macher Malaikari for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm prawn (jumbo or medium)
  • 1 cup (200 ml approx) coconut milk
  • 3 table-spoon posto bata (poppy seed paste)
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 6 green chillies, slitted from middle (adjust according to your tolerance)
  • 1 tea-spoon ginger paste
  • 1 tea-spoon garlic paste
  • 1.5 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1 + 1/2)
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon red chilli powder (optional)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon garam masala powder
  • as required oil (any oil) to fry the prawns
  • 3 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 1 table-spoon ghee
  • 1.5 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste

For Tempering:

  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch)
  • 4 cardamom, crushed
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 javitri

Method:

  • Cut the prawns keeping the head and tail intact. However, the choice is all yours. If you want you can discard these parts.
  • Wash and rub the prawns with 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Marinate for 30 minutes.
  • Heat oil in a pan and fry the prawns until they turn golden yellow. Remove and keep aside.
  • Now, heat mustard oil and ghee together in a pan and temper with the ingredients mentioned in For Tempering section. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add chopped onion and sautè until it turns golden brown. (Tips: while sauteing the onion, add few pinches of salt or sugar to make it brown fast).
  • Now, add ginger-garlic paste, 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder, coriander powder, cumin powder, red chilli powder, Kashmiri red chilli powder and required salt. Sprinkle a little water and stir for 3 minutes on low flame or until you stop getting the raw smell of the spices.
  • Add posto bata and mix well.
  • Add warm water and cover the lid. On a medium flame, bring it to a boil.
  • Now, add the fried prawns and give a quick stir.
  • Add coconut milk and again, mix well. Cover the lid and lower the flame. On a low to medium flame, cook for 10-15 minutes or until the prawns are done properly. Do not overcook the prawns.
  • Open the lid and sprinkle garam masala powder. Turn off the flame.
  • Your Chingri Macher Malaikari is ready to be served now.

If you wish you can garnish it with 1 table-spoon fresh coconut milk just before serving. Serve this dish with piping hot rice. I have seen people eating this with roti/chapatti, though, I don’t recommend it. This goes best only with gorom bhat.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali delicacy and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 

 
Tetul diye Cholar Dal (Split Chickpeas with Tamarind)

Tetul diye Cholar Dal (Split Chickpeas with Tamarind)

এ জগতে, হায়, সেই বেশি চায় আছে যার ভূরি ভূরি– রাজার হস্ত করে সমস্ত কাঙালের ধন চুরি। The above mentioned lines are from Rabindranath Thakur’s “দুই বিঘা জমি” (Dui Bigha Jomi). No, these lines have nothing to do with my today’s recipe. Then why these […]

 
Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

“Mache Bhate Bangali” (Bengalis by fish and rice) is a saying which is as true as “The Sun Rises in the East”. We have a kind of relation with fish which is beyond just loving it for our meals. For us, fish is not only […]

 
Posto Murgi or Posto Chicken (Chicken Cooked in Poppy Seed Paste)

Posto Murgi or Posto Chicken (Chicken Cooked in Poppy Seed Paste)

Posto Murgi or Posto Chicken is a delectable Bengali traditional dish. Bengalis love posto and it has been used in a wide range of our vegetarian and non vegetarian dishes. Posto Murgi has a mild taste and is a complete bliss if you have this with gorom bhat (steamed rice). It is always a hit in my home and I cook it often. Two chicken dishes my family can’t live without are Posto Murgi and Murgir Jhol and I cook both the dishes pretty well 🙂

See Other Posto Recipes Here

See Other Chicken Recipes Here

Posto or poppy seed has a special place in Bengali cuisine and a must have in my kitchen. Maa uses posto to cook mainly the vegetarian dishes and one of such dishes which is her specialty is Sheem Posto. However, I prefer to use posto in every possible way – I am a bid time fan of these seeds. Today’s dish is what I have childhood memories associated with. Pishimoni used to cook awesome Posto Murgi and I used to call it “shada shada murgir jhol” (white white chicken curry).

Growing up, this “shada shada murgir jhol” had been a part of my summer holiday meals as I used to spend the holidays at Pishimoni’s place. I remember Pishimoni pushing me to take bath and get ready for lunch. I hardly listen to her and hide inside my doll house. Then Pishimoni throws the ultimate weapon to me – “snan korbi na? shada shada murgir jhol ranna korechi” (will you not take bath? I have cooked posto murgi?). The tremendously naughty me gets obedient in the blink of an eye and follows all the instructions given by Pishimoni just to have my favourite chicken curry as early as possible.

I have learned this dish from Pishimoni and often recreate her magic at my kitchen. Also, this is a completely hassle free dish and the taste is guaranteed. So, if guests are at home and you are not sure of what to cook that your guests are going to love – this is the dish for you. Let’s have a look at the recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 kg curry cut chicken
  • 2 table-spoon mustard oil

For Marination:

  • 3 table-spoon yogurt, whisked 
  • a paste of 10 garlic cloves + 1 inch ginger + 3 green chillies
  • 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1 table-spoon mustard oil
  • salt, according to taste

For Tempering:

  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 5 green cardamom
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 star anise
  • 2 dried red chillies (broken to half)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon fennel seed

For Curry:

  • 1 big sized onion, finely chopped
  • 4 table-spoon poppy seed paste
  • 1 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste (if required)
  • a handful chopped coriander leaves

Method:

  • Wash the chicken and marinate with all the ingredients mentioned in “For Marination” section for 3 hours. If you want, you can marinate for long time than this, the longer the better.
  • Heat mustard oil in a pan and temper with the ingredients mentioned in “For Tempering” section. Allow them to splutter.
  • Now, add chopped onion and sautè until the onion turns golden brown.
  • Add the marinated chicken and give a quick mix. If the salt in the marination is not enough for you, this is the time when you can add extra salt.
  • Cover the lid and lower the flame. Allow the chicken to cook in its own moisture for 15 minutes.
  • Open the lid and add the poppy seed paste and mix very well.
  • Add water and again give a quick mix. Cover the lid and cook for another 10 minutes on medium flame.
  • Open the lid and add chopped coriander leaves. Turn off the flame.
  • Your Posto Murgi is ready to be served now.

Serve this dish hot with gorom bhat (steamed rice) and experience the bliss. This is a no fail recipe and will definitely make your meal delightful. Posto Murgi also goes very well with roti/chapatti/rumali roti.

Do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 
Chicken Chaap – Kolkata Style

Chicken Chaap – Kolkata Style

Chicken Chaap is traditionally a Mughlai dish brought to Bengal by the Mughals straight from Awadh. A large portion of Bengal’s traditional non vegetarian Muslim dishes have Awadhi influence on them and thanks to the Mughals for that. A lot of Mughlai dishes got a […]

 
Mete Chorchori (Lamb Liver Stir Fry)

Mete Chorchori (Lamb Liver Stir Fry)

Mete is the Bengali word for liver (chicken or mutton) and chorchori usually referred to a dish that is stir fried with minimum or no gravy. Mete Chorchori is a traditional Bengali delicacy which is prepared often in Bengali households with great love and care. […]

 
Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Fried Yellow Lentil)

Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Fried Yellow Lentil)

This is Maa‘s absolute favourite recipe. Maa loves moong dal (yellow lentil) and back home, this is the most popular dal that she cooks often. I am not a big fan of moong dal, though, don’t mind having it sometime. Simple and plain moong dal is too boring for me, rather, I like masoor dal that way. I like masoor dal in any form, but, the thing is not same with moong dal. For me to like moong dal, the recipe has to be very interesting. So, this is the recipe that Maa used to cook for me to make me eat moong dal. Now, this is the only moong dal recipe that I cook often in my kitchen and yes, I do love it. Though, I give some twist of my own to make it more interesting and adding coconut is one of them.

See Other Bengali Fish Recipes Here

Moong dal is considered as niramish (vegetarian) dal in Bengalis, whereas, masoor dal is amish (non-vegetarian). Moong dal is usually prepared with no onion and garlic. This recipe that I am going to write today contains fish head, but yet, no onion or garlic are added. Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal is a traditional Bengali dish and is one of the delectable non-veg makeover of this veg dal.

Bengalis cook moong dal in two ways – kancha (raw) and bhaja (fried). While both the forms are super tasty and healthy, bhaja moong has a different aroma and goes very well while cooking with fish. For bhaja moong dal, the lentil is dry roasted before cooking and it’s truly aromatic.

Packed with many amazing health benefits, moong dal is rich in fiber and protein and is excellent for keeping cholesterol under control and thus giving your heart a long life. This lentil also helps to keep the blood sugar level in control and a very rich source of antioxidants. Also, if you are looking for weight loss and healthy skin, moong dal is definitely your thing.

I love fish head and use it often to prepare dishes. I have few recipes of fish head in my blog and you can check them out. Today’s recipe of Macher Matha diye Moong Dal is protein packed, aromatic, healthy and highly delectable. Bongs love this dish and it goes excellent with bhat (rice). Adding coconut to it is my twist and is completely optional, yet, recommended. Here’s the step-by-step recipe for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 1 fish head and 1 tail piece (any fish, I used Rohu)
  • 1 cup moong dal
  • 1/3 cup chopped coconut
  • 5 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 1.5 tea-spoon turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin seeds
  • 2 cinnamon stick (each 1 inch)
  • 5 cloves
  • 5 green cardamom 
  • 1 inch ginger (finely chopped)
  • 2 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 2 table-spoon ghee
  • 5 cup water
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Rub the fish head and tail with 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder and salt.
  • Heat oil in a pan and shallow fry the pieces very well. Remove and keep aside.
  • In an separate heavy bottom pan, dry roast the moong dal until aroma starts spreading. Remove and keep aside.

  • In the same pan, dry roast the chopped coconut until it turns little brownish. Remove and keep aside.

  • Now, heat water in the same pan and bring to boil.

  • Meanwhile, wash the roasted moong dal 2-3 time in normal water and make it ready.

  • Once the water is boiled, add moong dal, green chillies, 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and required salt. Cover the lid and lower the flame. Cook for 15-20 minutes.

  • After the stipulated time, open the lid and check the dal. The dal should be cooked and broken by the time. If the find the dal has thickened too much, this is the time when you can add some more water (warm water).

  • Now, add the fish head and tail and mix well. Cover the lid and cook in medium flame for another 10 minutes.

  • You can open the lid in between and bread the head and tail with your spatula into small pieces. I break the tail into small pieces but, prefer not to break the head too much. The choice is yours.
  • After 10 minutes, open the lid and add chopped coconut. Give a quick mix. Cover the lid and cook for another 5 minutes.

  • Turn off the flame and keep the dal aside.
  • In a separate small pan, heat ghee and temper with cumin seeds, ginger, cinnamon, cardamom and cloves. Stir for 1 minute and turn off the flame.

  • Immediately, pour it to the dal and mix well.

  • Cover the dal and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  • Your Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal is ready to be served now.

Serve it hot with piping hot rice (gorom bhat) and enjoy this Bengali delicacy with your family. This should not go very well with roti/phulka as the dish contains lot of fish bones. As I say always, squeeze a piece of lemon while eating to enhance the taste.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali delicacy and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks. Happy eating!

 
Dhaba Style Mutton Curry – with Yogurt, Kasuri Methi & Butter

Dhaba Style Mutton Curry – with Yogurt, Kasuri Methi & Butter

I hardly use butter for cooking, but, this dish is different. When it comes to Indian Dhabas (road side food joints), we eat the food makkhan mar ke (with a dash of butter). This is totally different from the usual Bengali food that I cook […]