Tag: fish

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

Rui Mach (Rohu Fish) is probably the only fish that is available in abundance anywhere in India and my Bengali heart thanks the suppliers for that. This is the frequently bought fish in my home and I actually love to cook it in different ways […]

 
Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

Kajoli Mach, also known as Gangetic Ailia, is a fresh water fish and belongs to the catfish family. This fish is typically available and popular in Indian subcontinent. This fish is relatively small and cooked whole in various delectable forms. Happen to be one of […]

 
Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Often cooked with Golda Chingri (jumbo prawn), this malaikari or malai curry can be cooked equally well with small or medium sized prawn as well. This is a royal and rich dish with coconut milk that plays the trick. This dish is creamy and flavorful and goes fantastically well with gorom bhat (steamed rice). The mild yet rich taste of this curry happened to be the hot favourite of Britishers as well. Since the spiciness is drastically mellowed down with coconut milk, this dish does not taste as hot and spicy as any other typical Bengali dish.

See Other Prawn Recipes Here

It is said that chingri mach (prawn or shrimp) is for Ghoti (origin of West Bengal) and Ilish or Hilsha is for Bangal (origin of East Bengal). But this is not true always. I, being a hardcore Bangal, is a die-heart fan of chingri mach. I love chingri mach in any form or on any day and every day. Though, words fall short when I describe my love for Ilish mach, but, I love chingri as well.

“Malai” actually means “cream”, but, this dish does not contain any cream rather than the creamy coconut milk. It is said that this dish has its origin in Malaysia and the term “malai” is actually “malay” of Malaysia. This is a traditional dish and often cooked in Bengali weddings and festivals. Though this curry can be prepared with any type of prawn, but, the most preferred are large and medium sized prawn. Pishimoni used to add grated coconut in this curry while Maa cooks it only with coconut milk. I like Maa‘s version more and thus, I always cook it the way Maa does. Also, I have seen Maa using posto bata (poppy seed paste) and thus, I follow the same.

Today, I made this amazing dish on my sister’s demand and as usual, she loved it. You can make this curry with or without gravy. Adjust the water accordingly. I like it with gravy and thus used a little more water while making it. With that said, here’s the recipe of Chingri Macher Malaikari for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm prawn (jumbo or medium)
  • 1 cup (200 ml approx) coconut milk
  • 3 table-spoon posto bata (poppy seed paste)
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 6 green chillies, slitted from middle (adjust according to your tolerance)
  • 1 tea-spoon ginger paste
  • 1 tea-spoon garlic paste
  • 1.5 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1 + 1/2)
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon red chilli powder (optional)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon garam masala powder
  • as required oil (any oil) to fry the prawns
  • 3 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 1 table-spoon ghee
  • 1.5 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste

For Tempering:

  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch)
  • 4 cardamom, crushed
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 javitri

Method:

  • Cut the prawns keeping the head and tail intact. However, the choice is all yours. If you want you can discard these parts.
  • Wash and rub the prawns with 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Marinate for 30 minutes.
  • Heat oil in a pan and fry the prawns until they turn golden yellow. Remove and keep aside.
  • Now, heat mustard oil and ghee together in a pan and temper with the ingredients mentioned in For Tempering section. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add chopped onion and sautè until it turns golden brown. (Tips: while sauteing the onion, add few pinches of salt or sugar to make it brown fast).
  • Now, add ginger-garlic paste, 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder, coriander powder, cumin powder, red chilli powder, Kashmiri red chilli powder and required salt. Sprinkle a little water and stir for 3 minutes on low flame or until you stop getting the raw smell of the spices.
  • Add posto bata and mix well.
  • Add warm water and cover the lid. On a medium flame, bring it to a boil.
  • Now, add the fried prawns and give a quick stir.
  • Add coconut milk and again, mix well. Cover the lid and lower the flame. On a low to medium flame, cook for 10-15 minutes or until the prawns are done properly. Do not overcook the prawns.
  • Open the lid and sprinkle garam masala powder. Turn off the flame.
  • Your Chingri Macher Malaikari is ready to be served now.

If you wish you can garnish it with 1 table-spoon fresh coconut milk just before serving. Serve this dish with piping hot rice. I have seen people eating this with roti/chapatti, though, I don’t recommend it. This goes best only with gorom bhat.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali delicacy and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 

 
Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

“Mache Bhate Bangali” (Bengalis by fish and rice) is a saying which is as true as “The Sun Rises in the East”. We have a kind of relation with fish which is beyond just loving it for our meals. For us, fish is not only […]

 
Macher Shukto (Bengali Style Mixed Veg with Fish) – Thakurbarir Ranna

Macher Shukto (Bengali Style Mixed Veg with Fish) – Thakurbarir Ranna

This is another delicacy of Jorashako Thakur Bari, the house of Rabindranath Tagore. Also, this is the second recipe of my newly introduced Thakurbarir Ranna series. I proudly and happily can say that I have done a proper justice to this dish and also, given […]

 
Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Fried Yellow Lentil)

Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Fried Yellow Lentil)

This is Maa‘s absolute favourite recipe. Maa loves moong dal (yellow lentil) and back home, this is the most popular dal that she cooks often. I am not a big fan of moong dal, though, don’t mind having it sometime. Simple and plain moong dal is too boring for me, rather, I like masoor dal that way. I like masoor dal in any form, but, the thing is not same with moong dal. For me to like moong dal, the recipe has to be very interesting. So, this is the recipe that Maa used to cook for me to make me eat moong dal. Now, this is the only moong dal recipe that I cook often in my kitchen and yes, I do love it. Though, I give some twist of my own to make it more interesting and adding coconut is one of them.

See Other Bengali Fish Recipes Here

Moong dal is considered as niramish (vegetarian) dal in Bengalis, whereas, masoor dal is amish (non-vegetarian). Moong dal is usually prepared with no onion and garlic. This recipe that I am going to write today contains fish head, but yet, no onion or garlic are added. Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal is a traditional Bengali dish and is one of the delectable non-veg makeover of this veg dal.

Bengalis cook moong dal in two ways – kancha (raw) and bhaja (fried). While both the forms are super tasty and healthy, bhaja moong has a different aroma and goes very well while cooking with fish. For bhaja moong dal, the lentil is dry roasted before cooking and it’s truly aromatic.

Packed with many amazing health benefits, moong dal is rich in fiber and protein and is excellent for keeping cholesterol under control and thus giving your heart a long life. This lentil also helps to keep the blood sugar level in control and a very rich source of antioxidants. Also, if you are looking for weight loss and healthy skin, moong dal is definitely your thing.

I love fish head and use it often to prepare dishes. I have few recipes of fish head in my blog and you can check them out. Today’s recipe of Macher Matha diye Moong Dal is protein packed, aromatic, healthy and highly delectable. Bongs love this dish and it goes excellent with bhat (rice). Adding coconut to it is my twist and is completely optional, yet, recommended. Here’s the step-by-step recipe for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 1 fish head and 1 tail piece (any fish, I used Rohu)
  • 1 cup moong dal
  • 1/3 cup chopped coconut
  • 5 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 1.5 tea-spoon turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin seeds
  • 2 cinnamon stick (each 1 inch)
  • 5 cloves
  • 5 green cardamom 
  • 1 inch ginger (finely chopped)
  • 2 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 2 table-spoon ghee
  • 5 cup water
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Rub the fish head and tail with 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder and salt.
  • Heat oil in a pan and shallow fry the pieces very well. Remove and keep aside.
  • In an separate heavy bottom pan, dry roast the moong dal until aroma starts spreading. Remove and keep aside.

  • In the same pan, dry roast the chopped coconut until it turns little brownish. Remove and keep aside.

  • Now, heat water in the same pan and bring to boil.

  • Meanwhile, wash the roasted moong dal 2-3 time in normal water and make it ready.

  • Once the water is boiled, add moong dal, green chillies, 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and required salt. Cover the lid and lower the flame. Cook for 15-20 minutes.

  • After the stipulated time, open the lid and check the dal. The dal should be cooked and broken by the time. If the find the dal has thickened too much, this is the time when you can add some more water (warm water).

  • Now, add the fish head and tail and mix well. Cover the lid and cook in medium flame for another 10 minutes.

  • You can open the lid in between and bread the head and tail with your spatula into small pieces. I break the tail into small pieces but, prefer not to break the head too much. The choice is yours.
  • After 10 minutes, open the lid and add chopped coconut. Give a quick mix. Cover the lid and cook for another 5 minutes.

  • Turn off the flame and keep the dal aside.
  • In a separate small pan, heat ghee and temper with cumin seeds, ginger, cinnamon, cardamom and cloves. Stir for 1 minute and turn off the flame.

  • Immediately, pour it to the dal and mix well.

  • Cover the dal and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  • Your Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal is ready to be served now.

Serve it hot with piping hot rice (gorom bhat) and enjoy this Bengali delicacy with your family. This should not go very well with roti/phulka as the dish contains lot of fish bones. As I say always, squeeze a piece of lemon while eating to enhance the taste.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali delicacy and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks. Happy eating!

 
Komola Katla (Catla Fish Cooked in Orange Juice)

Komola Katla (Catla Fish Cooked in Orange Juice)

No love is greater than the love for food and to a Bengali like me, food is synonymous to fish 🙂 Valentine’s Day is here and to celebrate this day of love, I can’t think of anything else than fish. When the world is celebrating […]

 
Doi Chingri (Prawns Cooked in Yogurt)

Doi Chingri (Prawns Cooked in Yogurt)

Doi aka Yogurt/Curd is used in various dishes, both veg and non veg, in Bengali cuisine. We Bengalis love our Mishti Doi (sweet yogurt), but we have immense love for the sour version as well. Doi Chingri is a traditional Bengali non vegetarian delight where […]

 
Lai Shak diye Telapia (Tilapia Cooked with Mustard Greens)

Lai Shak diye Telapia (Tilapia Cooked with Mustard Greens)

Lai Shak aka Mustard Greens are widely used in the cuisines of Northeastern part of India. This is also famous in Bangladesh, specially in Sylhet. My ancestors hailed from that part of the globe an thus, many dishes that we prepare have the influence of Bangladeshi cuisine. As a Sylheti by blood and soul, my heart always longs for authentic Sylheti cuisine, far away from home. Yes, we eat Shutki mach (dry fish), Shidol (fermented fish) and also we eat lot of green leafy vegetables. Among all the other leaves, Mustard Greens are Baba‘s favourite, and mine too. Back home, Maa prepares a lot of interesting dishes with this leaf – from stir fry to bhorta (mash), from fish curry to bhaja (fry). Maa‘s kitchen has an ample of green leafs in stock every time, specially during winters.

In my kitchen, which is far away from my native, I often try to recreate Maa‘s magic. Atleast once or twice a week if I don’t make something typical Sylheti I feel super restless. My shutki-shidol loving soul often cries in solitude as it misses home and the food badly. Yes, I do prepare shutki often, but don’t get shidol here. But yes, whatever I get I make the best use of it. Just like Maa, I too use green leaves in many preparation and today’s dish is one such.

See More Fish Recipes Here

High in fiber and antioxidant, mustard greens help to keep cholesterol under control. These leaves are also storehouses of minerals and vitamins. In short, they are super food with huge health benefits. Fish, on the other hand, is excellent for heart and brain and has huge health benefits too. So, when these two super food mingle together, wonder happens. For these preparation, I used small sized whole Telapia aka Tilapia. If you want you can use any fish and if whole fish is not available, you can use cut pieces too. Here’s the recipe for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gms lai shak, separated from steam and chopped
  • 6 small sized whole telapia
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 6 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 8 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 inch ginger, finely chopped
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin seeds
  • 1.5 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1 + 1/2)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 4 table-spoon mustard oil (2 + 2)
  • 1 cup warm water 
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Rub the fish with 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder and salt.
  • Heat 2 table-spoon oil in a pan and shallow fry the fish. Remove and keep aside.
  • Heat the remaining oil and temper with cumin seeds. Allow them to splutter.

  • Add onion, garlic and ginger and sautè until the onion turns light golden brown.

  • Now, add tomato, remaining turmeric powder, cumin powder, coriander powder and salt. Sprinkle little water and stir until the tomato becomes mushy.

  • Add the chopped lai shak and mix well. Cover the lid and on medium flame cook for around 10 minutes or until the lai shak starts discharging water and 3/4th cooked.

  • Open the lid and check. If the water is less, add 1 cup warm water. There should be runny gravy.
  • Now, add the fish and give a quick mix. Cover the lid and cook for another 10 minutes on low flame.

  • Open the lid and your Lai Shak diye Telapia is ready to be served now.

Have this with steamed rice and squeeze a piece of lemon while eating to enhance the taste. Also, lai shak is hard to digest and thus, adding lemon juice is a kind of must wile eating.

Enjoy this authentic Sylheti style fish curry and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks. Happy eating!

 
Macher Matha diye Chanar Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Bengali Split Chickpeas)

Macher Matha diye Chanar Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Bengali Split Chickpeas)

As I always say, I love fish, just like many other Bengalis. We utilize actually the whole of it – from head to tail and even the eggs and other edible parts. Coming to me, more than fish, I love the fish head. But, it […]