Tag: bong kitchen

Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

Homemade sandesh (fudge) is pure nostalgia. Any festival or any occasion, sandesh is a must almost in every Bengali household. We make variety of sandesh that includes narkoler sandesh (coconut fudge), chhanar sandesh (cottage cheese fudge) and khirer sandesh. Sandesh is not actually something that […]

 
Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

With the advent of festive season many new flowers bloom, many new crops grow, our hearts deck up with new hopes and dreams and not to mention our kitchens – they just keep of spreading new aromas. There are actually some dishes which we specifically […]

 
Doi diye Alur Dom (Bengali Style Dum Alu with Yogurt) – Thakurbarir Ranna

Doi diye Alur Dom (Bengali Style Dum Alu with Yogurt) – Thakurbarir Ranna

……….উদয়দিগন্তে শঙ্খ বাজে, মোর চিত্তমাঝে
চিরনূতনেরে দিল ডাক
পঁচিশে বৈশাখ ।।

With the advent of Pochise Baisakh, the birthday of Kobiguru Rabindranath Tagore, here I present another great recipe from the kitchen of Tagores. I take immense pleasure to add another gem to my Thakurbarir Ranna series and this is a pure vegetarian dish. As usual, I have given my own twist in this dish and the outcome is just fantastic. It’s a hassle free and a must try recipe. Morning breakfast with this alur dom and luchi (Bengali deep fried puffy bread) and Sanchayita open by my side – this is truly a blessed morning!

Having a heart filled with the essence of Tagore, I celebrate him everyday. Since childhood, Tagore has been my greatest escape from all troubles and worries. In distress I hold him close to my heart and that makes me calm down. For me, Tagore is a therapy, he is a celebration, he is love and life, he is my God. Like many other Bengalis, Pochise Baisakh is an auspicious day for me. It’s been a ritual in our home to get up early that day, pay homage to Tagore by playing or singing his songs, placing a fresh garland on his photograph and the celebration continues with sweets and other special dishes.

Coming to the very dish Doi diye Alur Dom, this is a mild flavoured potato recipe which is cooked in dum style. The yogurt added in the curry is the game changer here. Yogurt give this dish a little tangy taste along with a smooth, creamy and mild texture. This dum aloo goes perfectly with Luchi and can also be consumed with gorom bhat (steamed rice). I got so carried away by the taste of this that I had it for breakfast and for lunch with luchi and gorom bhat respectively. The presentation in the photographs was my lunch scene today 🙂

Instead of adding roasted cumin, I tempered it with cumin seeds and fennel seeds. I have also added few other spices that are actually not there in the original recipe. Here’s how I made it.

Ingredients:

  • 800 gm baby potato
  • 300 gm yogurt
  • 5 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin seed
  • 1/2 tea-spoon fennel seed
  • 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1/2 + 1/2)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon garam masala powder
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch approx)
  • 3 cardamom, crushed
  • 3 clove
  • as required mustard oil to shallow fry the potatos
  • 2 table-spoon ghee
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Pressure cook the potatoes for maximum two whistles. Once the pressure cools down, open the lid and peel the skin of the potatoes. Keep aside the peeled potatoes.
  • Whisk the yogurt with 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Make sure that no lumps remain. Keep aside.
  • Rub the potatoes with 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Heat mustard oil and shallow fry the potatoes until golden yellow. Remove and keep aside.
  • Heat ghee in a pan and temper with cumin seeds, fennel seeds, cinnamon, cardamoms and cloves. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add the potatoes, cumin powder and Kashmiri red chilli powder. Sautè for 2 minutes.
  • Now, add the whisked yogurt and salt. Mix properly and cover the lid.
  • Cook on a low flame for 10 minutes or until the moisture of the yogurt gets dried up.
  • If you prefer a little gravy, add little water with the yogurt. Do not overcook the potatoes as they are pressure cooked already.
  • Once you get your desired consistency, sprinkle the garam masala powder and give a quick mix. Turn off the flame.
  • Your Doi diye Alur Dom is ready to be served now.

Serve this hot with any staple food of your choice, preferably fried bread. This is an authentic Bengali dish and it tastes heavenly.

Do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 

 
Aam Pora Shorbot / Bengali Aam Panna (Bengali Style Roasted Mango Summer Cooler)

Aam Pora Shorbot / Bengali Aam Panna (Bengali Style Roasted Mango Summer Cooler)

Aam Pora Shorbot is a very popular Bengali summer cooler and is made by roasting raw mango. The flavour of roasted mango mingles with the flavour of freshly chopped pudina pata (mint leaves) and creates something that is ultimate refreshing and cools you down instantly. […]

 
Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Often cooked with Golda Chingri (jumbo prawn), this malaikari or malai curry can be cooked equally well with small or medium sized prawn as well. This is a royal and rich dish with coconut milk that plays the trick. This dish is creamy and flavorful and […]

 
Tetul diye Cholar Dal (Split Chickpeas with Tamarind)

Tetul diye Cholar Dal (Split Chickpeas with Tamarind)

এ জগতে, হায়, সেই বেশি চায় আছে যার ভূরি ভূরি–
রাজার হস্ত করে সমস্ত কাঙালের ধন চুরি।

The above mentioned lines are from Rabindranath Thakur’s “দুই বিঘা জমি” (Dui Bigha Jomi). No, these lines have nothing to do with my today’s recipe. Then why these lines? Because, for me, there is nothing in the world that can describe the present social scenario better than these lines. While the society is sharply divided into haves and have nots, the poor is becoming more poor and the rich is continuing growing its bank balance. With that said, here I wish for all of us to get a good and unbiased governance this time. Happy Election Days! 😀 Eat good, feel good and vote wisely.

Starting the write up with a quotation from Tagore’s poem has another significance – yes, you got it – this is the third one of my recently introduced Thakurbarir Ranna series. Every Bengali has an untearable thread connected with Tagore. While we grow up singing his songs and reciting his poems, Sanchayita and Gitanjali are our holy books. Growing up, Tagore was my best escape from all worries and tensions and he still is. Recently, when I grabbed my copy of Thakurbarir Ranna, I made my way to bring Tagore to my kitchen as well. I am so happy.

Today’s dish is called Tetul diye Cholar Dal and I cooked it last Thursday when we had elections here in Bangalore. The reason behind the abrupt combination of elections and Tagore in this write up is partly this. Since the day was a holiday, I made the best use of it by trying out another gem of Jorashako Thakurbari kitchen.

This dish is mild, flavourful and has an awesome fusion of spiciness and tanginess in it. This versatile dish goes perfectly with steamed rice and luchi (Bengali deep fried puffy bread). This is different from the traditional Bengali Chanar/Cholar Dal that includes coconut. Tetul diye Cholar Dal is rather an unique combination where the boiled split chickpeas are cooked with tamarind puree with a dash of onion and garlic. Here’s the recipe for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cholar dal (split chickpeas)
  • 3/4 cup tamarind puree (adjust according to your taste)
  • 5 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 7 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin seeds
  • 3 dried red chillies
  • 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder 
  • 1/2 tea-spoon garam masala powder
  • 1 tea-spoon sugar
  • 1 table-spoon ghee
  • 2 table-spoon mustard oil
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Soak the chickpeas overnight. Before cooking, pressure cook the chickpeas with green chillies and little salt for 5 whistles. Let the pressure cool down naturally.
  • In a heavy bottom pan, dry roast cumin seeds and dried red chillies till aroma comes out. Let it cool down completely. Grind the roasted spices to make rough powder and keep aside.
  • Heat oil in a pan and temper with onion and garlic. Sautè until the onion turns golden brown.
  • Now, add the boiled chickpeas along with the water and give a quick mix.
  • Add salt and turmeric powder and cover with the lid. Cook for 5 minutes on medium flame.
  • Open the lid and add water if required and bring it to boil.
  • Add tamarind puree and cook for another 5 minutes.
  • Now, add roasted spice powder and ghee. Give it a quick mix. Turn the flame off.
  • Add sugar and sprinkle the garam masala. Cover the lid and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  • Your Tetul diye Cholar Dal is ready to be served now.

Serve this hot with rice or luchi and enjoy this authentic Thakurbarir Ranna 🙂

Do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 
Echorer Dalna / Kancha Kathaler Torkari (Bengali Style Raw Jackfruit Curry)

Echorer Dalna / Kancha Kathaler Torkari (Bengali Style Raw Jackfruit Curry)

Echorer Dalna or Kancha Kathaler Torkari is my summer favourite dish. Kancha Kathal (raw jackfruit) is also called “gach patha” (tree goat) in Bengali as, if cooked to perfection, the taste can actually substitute mutton. One must try it to believe it. Though, it can […]

 
Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

“Mache Bhate Bangali” (Bengalis by fish and rice) is a saying which is as true as “The Sun Rises in the East”. We have a kind of relation with fish which is beyond just loving it for our meals. For us, fish is not only […]

 
Posto Murgi or Posto Chicken (Chicken Cooked in Poppy Seed Paste)

Posto Murgi or Posto Chicken (Chicken Cooked in Poppy Seed Paste)

Posto Murgi or Posto Chicken is a delectable Bengali traditional dish. Bengalis love posto and it has been used in a wide range of our vegetarian and non vegetarian dishes. Posto Murgi has a mild taste and is a complete bliss if you have this with gorom bhat (steamed rice). It is always a hit in my home and I cook it often. Two chicken dishes my family can’t live without are Posto Murgi and Murgir Jhol and I cook both the dishes pretty well 🙂

See Other Posto Recipes Here

See Other Chicken Recipes Here

Posto or poppy seed has a special place in Bengali cuisine and a must have in my kitchen. Maa uses posto to cook mainly the vegetarian dishes and one of such dishes which is her specialty is Sheem Posto. However, I prefer to use posto in every possible way – I am a bid time fan of these seeds. Today’s dish is what I have childhood memories associated with. Pishimoni used to cook awesome Posto Murgi and I used to call it “shada shada murgir jhol” (white white chicken curry).

Growing up, this “shada shada murgir jhol” had been a part of my summer holiday meals as I used to spend the holidays at Pishimoni’s place. I remember Pishimoni pushing me to take bath and get ready for lunch. I hardly listen to her and hide inside my doll house. Then Pishimoni throws the ultimate weapon to me – “snan korbi na? shada shada murgir jhol ranna korechi” (will you not take bath? I have cooked posto murgi?). The tremendously naughty me gets obedient in the blink of an eye and follows all the instructions given by Pishimoni just to have my favourite chicken curry as early as possible.

I have learned this dish from Pishimoni and often recreate her magic at my kitchen. Also, this is a completely hassle free dish and the taste is guaranteed. So, if guests are at home and you are not sure of what to cook that your guests are going to love – this is the dish for you. Let’s have a look at the recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 kg curry cut chicken
  • 2 table-spoon mustard oil

For Marination:

  • 3 table-spoon yogurt, whisked 
  • a paste of 10 garlic cloves + 1 inch ginger + 3 green chillies
  • 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1 table-spoon mustard oil
  • salt, according to taste

For Tempering:

  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 5 green cardamom
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 star anise
  • 2 dried red chillies (broken to half)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon fennel seed

For Curry:

  • 1 big sized onion, finely chopped
  • 4 table-spoon poppy seed paste
  • 1 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste (if required)
  • a handful chopped coriander leaves

Method:

  • Wash the chicken and marinate with all the ingredients mentioned in “For Marination” section for 3 hours. If you want, you can marinate for long time than this, the longer the better.
  • Heat mustard oil in a pan and temper with the ingredients mentioned in “For Tempering” section. Allow them to splutter.
  • Now, add chopped onion and sautè until the onion turns golden brown.
  • Add the marinated chicken and give a quick mix. If the salt in the marination is not enough for you, this is the time when you can add extra salt.
  • Cover the lid and lower the flame. Allow the chicken to cook in its own moisture for 15 minutes.
  • Open the lid and add the poppy seed paste and mix very well.
  • Add water and again give a quick mix. Cover the lid and cook for another 10 minutes on medium flame.
  • Open the lid and add chopped coriander leaves. Turn off the flame.
  • Your Posto Murgi is ready to be served now.

Serve this dish hot with gorom bhat (steamed rice) and experience the bliss. This is a no fail recipe and will definitely make your meal delightful. Posto Murgi also goes very well with roti/chapatti/rumali roti.

Do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 
Macher Shukto (Bengali Style Mixed Veg with Fish) – Thakurbarir Ranna

Macher Shukto (Bengali Style Mixed Veg with Fish) – Thakurbarir Ranna

This is another delicacy of Jorashako Thakur Bari, the house of Rabindranath Tagore. Also, this is the second recipe of my newly introduced Thakurbarir Ranna series. I proudly and happily can say that I have done a proper justice to this dish and also, given […]