Tag: bengali cuisine

Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

Homemade sandesh (fudge) is pure nostalgia. Any festival or any occasion, sandesh is a must almost in every Bengali household. We make variety of sandesh that includes narkoler sandesh (coconut fudge), chhanar sandesh (cottage cheese fudge) and khirer sandesh. Sandesh is not actually something that […]

 
Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

With the advent of festive season many new flowers bloom, many new crops grow, our hearts deck up with new hopes and dreams and not to mention our kitchens – they just keep of spreading new aromas. There are actually some dishes which we specifically […]

 
Doi diye Alur Dom (Bengali Style Dum Alu with Yogurt) – Thakurbarir Ranna

Doi diye Alur Dom (Bengali Style Dum Alu with Yogurt) – Thakurbarir Ranna

……….উদয়দিগন্তে শঙ্খ বাজে, মোর চিত্তমাঝে
চিরনূতনেরে দিল ডাক
পঁচিশে বৈশাখ ।।

With the advent of Pochise Baisakh, the birthday of Kobiguru Rabindranath Tagore, here I present another great recipe from the kitchen of Tagores. I take immense pleasure to add another gem to my Thakurbarir Ranna series and this is a pure vegetarian dish. As usual, I have given my own twist in this dish and the outcome is just fantastic. It’s a hassle free and a must try recipe. Morning breakfast with this alur dom and luchi (Bengali deep fried puffy bread) and Sanchayita open by my side – this is truly a blessed morning!

Having a heart filled with the essence of Tagore, I celebrate him everyday. Since childhood, Tagore has been my greatest escape from all troubles and worries. In distress I hold him close to my heart and that makes me calm down. For me, Tagore is a therapy, he is a celebration, he is love and life, he is my God. Like many other Bengalis, Pochise Baisakh is an auspicious day for me. It’s been a ritual in our home to get up early that day, pay homage to Tagore by playing or singing his songs, placing a fresh garland on his photograph and the celebration continues with sweets and other special dishes.

Coming to the very dish Doi diye Alur Dom, this is a mild flavoured potato recipe which is cooked in dum style. The yogurt added in the curry is the game changer here. Yogurt give this dish a little tangy taste along with a smooth, creamy and mild texture. This dum aloo goes perfectly with Luchi and can also be consumed with gorom bhat (steamed rice). I got so carried away by the taste of this that I had it for breakfast and for lunch with luchi and gorom bhat respectively. The presentation in the photographs was my lunch scene today 🙂

Instead of adding roasted cumin, I tempered it with cumin seeds and fennel seeds. I have also added few other spices that are actually not there in the original recipe. Here’s how I made it.

Ingredients:

  • 800 gm baby potato
  • 300 gm yogurt
  • 5 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin seed
  • 1/2 tea-spoon fennel seed
  • 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1/2 + 1/2)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon garam masala powder
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch approx)
  • 3 cardamom, crushed
  • 3 clove
  • as required mustard oil to shallow fry the potatos
  • 2 table-spoon ghee
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Pressure cook the potatoes for maximum two whistles. Once the pressure cools down, open the lid and peel the skin of the potatoes. Keep aside the peeled potatoes.
  • Whisk the yogurt with 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Make sure that no lumps remain. Keep aside.
  • Rub the potatoes with 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Heat mustard oil and shallow fry the potatoes until golden yellow. Remove and keep aside.
  • Heat ghee in a pan and temper with cumin seeds, fennel seeds, cinnamon, cardamoms and cloves. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add the potatoes, cumin powder and Kashmiri red chilli powder. Sautè for 2 minutes.
  • Now, add the whisked yogurt and salt. Mix properly and cover the lid.
  • Cook on a low flame for 10 minutes or until the moisture of the yogurt gets dried up.
  • If you prefer a little gravy, add little water with the yogurt. Do not overcook the potatoes as they are pressure cooked already.
  • Once you get your desired consistency, sprinkle the garam masala powder and give a quick mix. Turn off the flame.
  • Your Doi diye Alur Dom is ready to be served now.

Serve this hot with any staple food of your choice, preferably fried bread. This is an authentic Bengali dish and it tastes heavenly.

Do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 

 
Aam Pora Shorbot / Bengali Aam Panna (Bengali Style Roasted Mango Summer Cooler)

Aam Pora Shorbot / Bengali Aam Panna (Bengali Style Roasted Mango Summer Cooler)

Aam Pora Shorbot is a very popular Bengali summer cooler and is made by roasting raw mango. The flavour of roasted mango mingles with the flavour of freshly chopped pudina pata (mint leaves) and creates something that is ultimate refreshing and cools you down instantly. […]

 
Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Chingri Macher Malaikari / Chingri Macher Malai Curry (Bengali Style Prawn with Coconut Milk)

Often cooked with Golda Chingri (jumbo prawn), this malaikari or malai curry can be cooked equally well with small or medium sized prawn as well. This is a royal and rich dish with coconut milk that plays the trick. This dish is creamy and flavorful and […]

 
Chhanar Jilapi / Bengali Style Cottage Cheese Jalebi

Chhanar Jilapi / Bengali Style Cottage Cheese Jalebi

On a hot summer afternoon, Maa just put a pan full of milk on the stove top to let it boil. Soon after Maa literally screamed in anguish “issh, sob dudh fete gelo…bhebechilam payesh banabo…sob dudh fete gelo” (thought of making rice pudding today but alas, the milk got curdled). This sometimes happen during summer. You just want to boil the milk and it gets curdled. Maa gets annoyed very easily when these things happen. She went on saying “dhur ajker ranna o sesh, chhana ta rekhe dei, kalke chhanar dalna baniye nebo” (I done with the day’s cooking. I will better keep the chhana today and tomorrow I will make Chhanar Dalna). Pishimoni smiled and said “chhana ta amake dao, ami bacchader jonne mishti baniye debo” (give the cheese to make, I will make sweets for the kids). Maa replied “issh tumio paro, tomar shotti dhorjo ache go” (you truly have patience).

See Other Bengali Sweet Recipes Here

Hearing of mishti (sweet), the next scene was me and my sister running after Pishimoni and poking her “chhana diye ki banabe?” (what will you prepare with the cheese). Pishimoni smiled at us and said “chhanar jilapi khabi? khele baniye debo” (will you eat chhanar jilapi? if yes, I will make it for you). We both the sisters were like “ha khabo, ha khabo…ekhoni banao” (yes yes…make now only). Pishimoni set with the cheese and started kneading it with other required ingredients and said “bhalokore dekhe shikhe nao, boro hole nije banate parbe” (see how I make it and learn properly…you can make by yourself when you grow up). Both of us set in front of her and started observing the process very minutely. Honestly speaking, we were not that much into learning, but, waiting her to finish early so that we can start gulping 😛

After that day, this sweet often used to be on our demand list whenever we used to visit Pishimoni’s place or she used to come over. We often used to finish it in one go. Maa is not that much into sweets, but, Baba used to accompany us. Time passed by and we grew up. Pishimoni is no more. I sometime make Chhanar Jilapi and whenever I do, I remember Pishimoni. She was a magician with God gifted culinary skills. Baba often say that I make better sweets than Maa and I have the traits of Pishimoni in me. Whatever I have learned from Pishimoni, I treasure everything close to my heart.

Coming to Chhanar Jilapi, this is a traditional Bengali sweet which is made of cottage cheese. This is a deep fried, melt-in-mouth cottage cheese knot that gets its sweet taste after being immersed in a runny sugar syrup. It can be served both hot and cold, though, hot is always what I prefer. With very few ingredients, this sweet tastes heavenly and is not that tough to make.

Bengali New Year aka Poila Boishakh is arriving and like many other Bengali houses, my house decked up with new decorations and my kitchen with some sweets and non vegetarian preparations. Today I made Chhanar Jilapi for some friends who came over. This is definitely going to be on my Poila Boishakh party menu as well. Here’s the recipe for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 1 litre full fat milk
  • 3 table-spoon lemon juice
  • 2 table-spoon maida (all purpose flour)
  • 1 table-spoon sooji (samolina)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon baking powder
  • 2 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch saffron soaked in 1 table-spoon warm milk
  • 2 cup sugar
  • 3.5 cup water
  • as required oil or ghee for deep frying (you can mix both in equal proportion)

Method:

Making Chhana (cottage cheese)

  • In a pan, heat the milk and bring it to boil. Turn off the flame.
  • Immediately, add lime juice and mix. You will observe that water starts separating from the fat. Your Chhana (cottage cheese) is done. Let it cool down.
  • Drain the water to get the chhana. Pour the chhana on a cotton cloth and squeeze to drain the excess water.
  • To completely drain the water away, tie the cloth and hand for atleast 1 hour.

Making Chhanae Jilapi

  • Take the chhana in a mixing bowl and knead to a soft and smooth dough.
  • Now, add maida, baking powder, sooji, salt and the saffron soaked milk. Knead the entire thing properly for 10-15 minutes to a soft and smooth dough. Once it does not stick to your hand, the dough is ready.
  • Remember, kneading is the key. The more you knead, the more soft and smooth your jilapi will be. Once
  • Cover the dough with a cloth and let it rest for 30 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, in a heavy bottom pan, heat water and add sugar. Heat it constantly in high flame until the sugar gets dissolved, water gets reduced and the syrup comes to 1 string.
  • Once the syrup is done, keep it aside and let it cool down a little bit.
  • Now, take the chhana dough and cut small balls from it. The given quantity of ingredients should give you 7-8 pieces of jilapi.
  • With the help of your palm, roll out long ropes out of the chhana balls and swirl them in circular jilapi (jalebi) pattern.
  • Now, heat oil ghee (or both mixed together) in a pan and deep fry the jilapis until they turn reddish brown.
  • Pour the hot jilapis immediately to the syrup once they are fried.
  • Soak the jilapis in syrup for atleast and hour or so. Your Chhanar Jilapi is ready to be served.

You can consume them immediately or can store them in refrigerator for 2-3 days. But, Chhanar Jilapi always tastes when served hot.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali delicacy and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy eating!

 
Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

“Mache Bhate Bangali” (Bengalis by fish and rice) is a saying which is as true as “The Sun Rises in the East”. We have a kind of relation with fish which is beyond just loving it for our meals. For us, fish is not only […]

 
Posto Murgi or Posto Chicken (Chicken Cooked in Poppy Seed Paste)

Posto Murgi or Posto Chicken (Chicken Cooked in Poppy Seed Paste)

Posto Murgi or Posto Chicken is a delectable Bengali traditional dish. Bengalis love posto and it has been used in a wide range of our vegetarian and non vegetarian dishes. Posto Murgi has a mild taste and is a complete bliss if you have this […]

 
Macher Shukto (Bengali Style Mixed Veg with Fish) – Thakurbarir Ranna

Macher Shukto (Bengali Style Mixed Veg with Fish) – Thakurbarir Ranna

This is another delicacy of Jorashako Thakur Bari, the house of Rabindranath Tagore. Also, this is the second recipe of my newly introduced Thakurbarir Ranna series. I proudly and happily can say that I have done a proper justice to this dish and also, given a few twists of my own to this very innovative dish.

See Other Fish Recipes Here

Shukto or Shuktani, having its origin in Portuguese cuisine, is a traditional Bengali dish and a star of every Bengali vegetarian kitchen. Shukto can be termed as a very interesting vegetable medley cooked in the paste of mustard and poppy seeds. Both of these seeds are integral parts of Bengali cuisine, and so is Shukto. It is also considered as a sattvic aahar as it contains no onion or garlic.

Our very humble and pure vegetarian Shukto got this non vegetarian twist in the kitchen of Tagores. The medley can be created with any vegetable of your choice. While bitter gourd is almost a must for the vegetarian version, this is not the same with the non vegetarian version. Also, the original recipe has only two vegetables, but, I have added my very favourite potato. Instead of grated ginger, I have used finely chopped ginger and believe me, it turned out to be delicious.

The fun of experimenting with food has its own charm and it’s addictive. Though sometimes this fun costs you and I too have the experience of few kitchen disasters while doing the experiments. But, the obsession of creating something new always drives me crazy and also helps me keep going with my experiments. This recipe is one such. I was very unsure about the result as this is not something I grew up eating. But, after cooking it in my own way and having it I can say that this is a worth trying recipe. Here’s it for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 4 big slice fish (I used Rohu)
  • 3 long brinjal, chopped to 1 inch pieces
  • 2 medium sized ridge gourd, chopped to 1 inch pieces
  • 2 potato, vertically diced
  • 3 table-spoon mustard seeds
  • 1 table-spoon poppy seeds
  • 1/2 table-spoon panch phoron
  • 6 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 2 dried red chillies
  • 1 table-spoon chopped ginger
  • 2 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1/2 + 1/2 + 1/2 + 1/2)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 2 table-spoon + as required mustard oil to fry the vegetables & fish
  • 1 tea-spoon sugar
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Heat a pan and dry roast mustard seeds, poppy seeds and panch phoron together. Let them cool down and then grind to powder. Add water to the powder mixture and keep aside.
  • Rub fish with 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and salt. Shallow fry in required quantity of oil.
  • Now, break the fish pieces and take out the bones carefully. There should not be any bones left. Mash the fish little bit and keep aside.
  • Heat required oil again and shallow fry brinjal and ridge gourd together by adding 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt until the vegetables turn soft. Remove and keep aside.
  • Heat oil again and shallow fry potato by adding 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Fry until potato turns golden yellow. Remove and keep aside.
  • Now, heat 2 table-spoon oil and temper with dried red chillies and ginger. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add cumin powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder and salt. Sprinkle some water and stir on low flame for 2 minutes.
  • Now, add fish and again stir for 2-3 minutes.
  • Add the mustard-poppy-panch phoron powder soaked in water to the fish and mix properly. Cover and let it cook for 5 minutes on low flame.
  • Add the vegetables and green chillies. Give a quick mix.
  • Now, add warm water and cover the lid. On a low to medium flame, cook for 15 minutes or until the vegetables are done properly.
  • Check on the consistency. It should be on thicker side. If water remains then cook for some more time after opening the lid. Once it becomes thick, it’s done.
  • At last, add sugar and give the whole thing a proper mix. Turn off the flame.
  • Your Macher Shukto is ready to be served now.

Serve this hot with gorom bhat (rice) and enjoy this authentic Thakurbarir dish.

Do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 
Fulkopir Paturi (Bengali Style Cauliflower Dum) – Thakurbarir Ranna

Fulkopir Paturi (Bengali Style Cauliflower Dum) – Thakurbarir Ranna

This is a gem from the house of Tagores. Apart from being a writer, Rabindranath Tagore was a foodie too. His love for food resulted in the formation of many innovative recipes in Jorasanko Thakur Bari kitchen. Many Bengali vegetarian and non vegetarian dishes had their […]