Author: Deepsikha

Lamb Yakhni Pulao / Mutton Yakhni Pulao / Gosht Yakhni Pulao

Lamb Yakhni Pulao / Mutton Yakhni Pulao / Gosht Yakhni Pulao

It always amazes me to see and know about the rich food culture of India and the world around. I sometime wonder, what had actually passed through the mind of those food geniuses when they first invented their respective signature dishes. What could be the […]

 
Mango Kulfi

Mango Kulfi

Totally desi, totally amazing, totally yummy – yes, that’s how our very own Kulfi is. Summer means Kulfi and this is probably the only best thing about summer (I hate summer). Indian summers are exactly what we used to see in Dermi Cool ads – […]

 
Luchi (Bengali Deep Fried Puffy Bread)

Luchi (Bengali Deep Fried Puffy Bread)

Luchi needs no introduction. We the Bengalis often love to call it Fulko Luchi as it is puffy and round in shape. If it is not puffy enough, it is not Luchi. As I am writing this and remembering what I had today for breakfast, my mouth is literally watering. I have decided to repeat Luchi-Mangsho tomorrow as well 😛

Bengalis love Luchi and it is their most favourite breakfast option. Paired with Kosha Mangsho, Aloo Dum, Sada Aloo Torkari, Aloo Bhaja, Begun Bhaja or any other dry or semi-gravy dish, Luchi can actually make you go gaga over it. Also, many people have the notion that Luchi and Poori are the same, but in reality, they are not. Among other differences that Luchi and Poori have, the main being that Luchi is made typically with maida and Poori is made with atta.

Although Luchi is easy to make but few tricks needed when you are targeting for perfectly puffy Luchi. How perfect your Luchi is going to be entirely depends on the proportion of the ingredients and how you knead the dough. The trick is that the number of cups of maida you are taking should be directly proportional to the number of table-spoons of refined oil you are adding to it. Also, always use lukewarm water and never fry over high flame. To know more, please refer to the recipe below.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cup maida (all purpose flour)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon salt
  • 3 table-spoon refined oil for dough + more for deep frying
  • lukewarm water, as required

Method:

  • In a mixing bowl mix maida, salt and oil together and crumble. The trick is, if you hold and press some flour with fist it should come to a shape but should break immediately with a light touch.
  • Now, add water portion by portion and knead a dough. The dough should not be too soft or too tight. Cover and let it rest for 30 minutes.
  • Cut small and equal portions from the dough.
  • Grease the surface with some oil where you are rolling and also grease your rolling pin.
  • Roll one by one maintain equal size. Do not roll them too thick or too thin, rather, just optimum. Also, roll them evenly from centre to the edges.
  • Heat sufficient oil in a deep bottom wok. Once the oil is properly heated, lower the flame.
  • Add one rolled Luchi to the oil and press lightly with the spatula. It will help the Luchi to puff. Once it’s puffy, turn. Remove from the oil and transfer to a large vessel.
  • In the same way fry the entire batch one by one.
  • Do not over-fry the Luchis. The idea is to keep them as white as possible. If it is puffy it is well fried.
  • Your Luchi or Fulko Luchi is ready to be served now.

Serve hot with your desired dish. If you don’t feel like preparing anything to have with Luchis then don’t worry. You can have them simply with sugar or milk cream – they will taste heavenly.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali dish and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 
Rui Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Rohu Fish Stew)

Rui Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Rohu Fish Stew)

I said many times earlier, yet again I am telling, I Love Fish. Fish curry is my ultimate go for dish. We Bengalis believe that every day is a fish day. We need fish for any occasion, we need fish for any mundane day. We […]

 
Sada Aloo Torkari (Bengali Style Potato Curry)

Sada Aloo Torkari (Bengali Style Potato Curry)

In any Bengali household, this is probably the most easy breakfast option when you are craving for something quick and simple yet wholesome and tasty. Always a made-in-heaven partner of Luchi (Bengali deep fried puffy bread), Sada Aloo Torkari is made with absolutely no spices. […]

 
Dimer Jhuri Torkari (Scrambled Egg Curry)

Dimer Jhuri Torkari (Scrambled Egg Curry)

They say “Sunday ho ya Monday, roz khao aande” and I follow them. My family has the custom of not saying no to eggs. My husband loves egg and can choose egg over any dish, any day. I often cook egg curry and try to come out with new recipes whenever possible. Today’s dish is a unique one and this is Maa‘s speciality. I have come across a variety of egg dishes but this particular dish is, probably, solely cooked by Maa and no one else. This is truly delicious.

See More Egg Recipes Here

The world is in crisis. We all are following lockdown and earnestly praying for a better tomorrow. To cope up with this situation we all are doing what we love to do. May we emerge to better versions of ourselves and step on to the brighter side with smiling faces. Speaking of smile, cooking makes me smile, always 🙂 But, with the limited supply and strict rationing, one hardly has the luxury of experimenting. Whatever we cook must be bang on; we cannot afford wastage.

So, when husband requested me (he never demands) to make something with egg, I wanted to make something unique. ‘Something unique with eggs, but what?’ I asked myself. I just can’t experiment, what if something goes wrong! I was desperately in need of a unique recipe which is full-proof. Called Maa and she, the saviour, explained her very special and popular Dimer Jhuri Torkari to me.

Mission accomplished. Made the dish in no time and it turned out to be super yummy. Sharing the recipe of the same with you all. Hope you like it.

Ingredients:

  • 5 egg
  • 1 potato, cut into small dices
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 4 green chilli, chopped (3 + 1 for garnishing)
  • 1 table-spoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1/4 + 1/4 + 1/2)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon garam masala
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin seed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch approx)
  • 3 clove
  • 3 green cardamon (crushed)
  • 4 table-spoon mustard oil or any cooking oil (2 + 2)
  • 1 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Break the eggs in a mixing bowel and add 1/4 tea-spoon turmeric powder and required salt. Beat properly and keep aside.
  • Heat little oil in a pan and shallow fry the potato cubes by adding 1/4 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Cook until potato cubes are 70% done. Remove and keep aside.
  • Heat 2 table-spoon oil in the same pan and add the beaten eggs. Stir vigorously to scramble it properly. When the scrambled egg is done, remove and keep aside.
  • Heat the remaining oil and temper with cumin seed, bay leaf, cinnamon, clove and cardamon. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add chopped onion and sauté until it becomes translucent.
  • Now, add ginger-garlic paste and stir until the raw smell goes off completely.
  • Add green chilli and chopped tomato. Stir until tomato turns mushy.
  • Now, add the remaining turmeric powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, Kashmiri red chilli powder and salt. Sprinkle little water and stir for a minute or so.
  • Add fried potato and mix well. Add water and cover the lid. Cook until the potato cubes are well done.
  • Now, open the lid and add the scrambled egg. Mix properly and lower the flame. If you find the gravy too dry, add some more warm water at this stage.
  • Cover the lid and cook for 7 minutes over low to medium flame.
  • Open lid and sprinkle garam masala. Give it a stir and turn the flame off.
  • Your Dimer Jhuri Torkari is ready to be served now.

Serve this unique dish with roti/chapati or have it with rice, it wont fail to impress you. Cook, eat, be happy, be with your family and most importantly, be at home. This too shall pass 🙂

Do try this and let me know in comments about how you like it. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

 
Tetuler Achar (Tamarind Sweet and Sour Pickle)

Tetuler Achar (Tamarind Sweet and Sour Pickle)

For me, and for many like me, this is a tangy, spicy and yummy way to get back the flavour of childhood. There were roadside joints outside my school gate selling Tetuler Achar. As the last bell rang, we run to the gate with all […]

 
Dhaba Style Butter Keema Masala

Dhaba Style Butter Keema Masala

The great Gulzar Sahab said “In umr se lambi sadkon ko manzil pe pahunchte dekha nehi… Bas daurti phirti reheti hai, humne to theherte dekha nehi…” (these roads, long as ages, never saw them reach destination…they just run, never saw them halt for once) Probably […]

 
Panta Bhat / Poita Bhat

Panta Bhat / Poita Bhat

Stored with many micronutrients, probably much more than freshly cooked rice, Panta Bhat has high nutritional value and is a super immunity booster. Consumed mostly in Bangladesh, Odisa, Assam, Tripura and West Bengal, this dish is still hugely popular in rural parts. Sadly, we the urban people hardly consume it and the knowledge is limited to what we have heard from grandmas and grandpas. Thanks to some top-notch restaurant brands, this forgotten dish is now coming back to our kitchen and yes, no one can have it just once. It is utterly delicious.

Internet is flooded with the history and benefits of Panta Bhat and thus, I am not going to repeat the same. In my home, Panta Bhat has always been eaten with great joy and satisfaction. Growing up, I have seen Maa soaking cooked rice in water overnight. The next morning she used to serve the same to us with bhajas (fries), bhartas (mash) and dry roasted coconut. Before starting for school, this was one of the most common dishes that we used to have, specially in summer.

The process of making Panta Bhat is too simple. Have it in breakfast or in lunch, choice is yours. Serve it with different bhajas, specially, mach bhaja (fish fry) or dim bhaja (egg fry). While most of the people relish Panta Bhat with mach bhaja, I always prefer it with dim bhaja. Here I explain you quickly how I make it.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup (250 gm approx) small grain rice (preferably gobindobhog)
  • 2 onion, chopped
  • 4 green chilli, slitted
  • 1 slice lemon (preferably gondhoraj lebu)
  • 3 roasted dry red chilli
  • 1.5 table-spoon mustard oil
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Soak the cooked rice overnight in normal water. The water level should be just sufficient enough to soak the entire rice – neither less, nor too much.
  • The next morning (or afternoon), take the rice and crush the rice by using your hand. Do not discard the water.
  • Now, add onion, green chilli, roasted red chilli, oil, lemon juice and salt to it. Use your hand once again to crush everything and mix properly.
  • Your highly nutritious Panta Bhat is ready to be served now.

While the summer is slowly approaching, you are ready to beat the heat with this super delicious probiotic summer cooler. Panta Bhat or Poita Bhat or whatever else you call it goes amazingly well with bhaja and bharta. Try it and your gut will definitely thank you.

Do try this and let me know in comments about how you like it. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks. Happy Eating!

 
Hansher Dim Kosha (Bengali Style Duck Egg Spicy Curry)

Hansher Dim Kosha (Bengali Style Duck Egg Spicy Curry)

Hansher Dim Kosha has always been my hot favourite and it’s such a dish which is actually close to my heart as it reminds me of Pishimoni. Among all the other awesome dishes the genius lady used to cook, this dish in particular had been […]