Search Results: mutton

Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

With the advent of festive season many new flowers bloom, many new crops grow, our hearts deck up with new hopes and dreams and not to mention our kitchens – they just keep of spreading new aromas. There are actually some dishes which we specifically […]

 
Bhuna Mangsho / Bhuna Mutton – Eid Special Mutton Recipe

Bhuna Mangsho / Bhuna Mutton – Eid Special Mutton Recipe

Bakra Eid is round the corner and my house is all decked up in celebration colour and mood. Mr. Husband is super excited and thus the celebration has already started almost one week prior Eid. While many non-veg dishes are in my bucket list for […]

 
Railway Mutton Curry – An Authentic Colonial Dish

Railway Mutton Curry – An Authentic Colonial Dish

Introduced during the colonial period by the chefs of Indian Railway, this Anglo Indian mutton curry had been served to the first-class passengers of Indian railway at that time. Railway Mutton Curry was first served on the Blue Train which ran between Victoria Terminus and Calcutta (now Kolkata) via Allahabad (as said by Ms Bridget White Kumar, an Anglo-Indian cuisine expert).

See Other Mutton Recipes Here

Alongside with Mutton Dakbunglow, this dish too has its origin in the British era. The legend has it that once a drunk British officer paid a sudden visit to the pantry section of a particular train where the cooks were having their meals. As, most of the cooks were Bengali, the dish that they were having is Pathar Mangsho. The Officer insisted to have it but the cooks knew that it would be too spicy for him. One of the cooks had an idea and he whisked some curd and added to the curry to mellow down its spiciness. It is said that the officer loved it so much that he started demanding for the same more often.

That was the time when the cooks unofficially served the Railway Mutton Curry for the very first time. Later, they found out a more better way to substitute curd and added coconut milk. Gradually, it became very famous among both the Britishers and Indians. The dish gained so much popularity that the Indian railway started serving the same to it first class passengers.

Railway Mutton Curry can be seen as the mild version of Bengali Pathar Mangsho or Kosha Mangsho. The coconut milk is the game changer here. Goes perfectly with gorom bhat (steamed rice) or even with roti/naan, this dish can be made by adding both coconut milk and curd or just coconut milk. I prefer to add just coconut milk and it is my family favourite dish. This Naboborsho (Bengali New Year), here I am again with this delectable Anglo-Indian dish. While I get ready to welcome my guests with this, you go ahead a have a look at the recipe given below.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm mutton (curry cut)
  • 1 large onion, roughly chopped
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1 large potato, diced
  • 3/4 cup coconut milk
  • 5 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 1 table-spoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 3 table-spoon mustard oil
  • a handful chopped coriander leaves
  • salt, according to taste
  • 1.5 cup warm water

For Tempering:

  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 dried red chillies
  • 1/2 tea-spoon fennel seeds
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin seeds
  • 3 green cardamom
  • 2 black cardamom
  • 5 cloves
  • 1 star anise
  • 1 javitri

Method:

  • Wash and pressure cook the mutton to 5 whistles. Once the pressure cools down, keep aside the boiled mutton along with its stock.
  • Heat oil in a pan and temper with all the ingredients mentioned in For Tempering section. Allow them to splutter.
  • Now, add onion and sautè until it turns golden brown.
  • Add ginger-garlic paste, turmeric powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, Kashmiri red chilli powder and salt. Sprinkle some water and stir on low flame for 3 minutes.
  • Add tomato and stir until it gets blended.
  • Now, add potato and give a quick mix. Add water and cover the lid. On a medium flame, cook until the potato is done.
  • Once the potato is done, add the mutton with its stock. Mix properly and cook for another 10-15 minutes on a low flame.
  • Now, open the lid and add coconut milk. Give a quick mix. Stir and cook for another 5 minutes.
  • Sprinkle the chopped coriander leaves and turn off the flame.
  • Cover the lid and let it rest for 10 minutes. Your Railway Mutton Curry is ready to be served now.

My Naboborsho is sorted with this amazing colonial dish and I am just about to welcome my guests 🙂 With that said, Wishing you a very Happy Bengali New Year, Shubho Naboborsho!!!

Enjoy this mutton curry and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy eating!!!

 

 

 
Dhaba Style Mutton Curry – with Yogurt, Kasuri Methi & Butter

Dhaba Style Mutton Curry – with Yogurt, Kasuri Methi & Butter

I hardly use butter for cooking, but, this dish is different. When it comes to Indian Dhabas (road side food joints), we eat the food makkhan mar ke (with a dash of butter). This is totally different from the usual Bengali food that I cook […]

 
Pathar Mangshor Jhol / Kochi Pathar Jhol (Bengali Style Mutton Curry)

Pathar Mangshor Jhol / Kochi Pathar Jhol (Bengali Style Mutton Curry)

“Bajare kochi patha pawai jay na ajkal” (it’s hard to get tender mutton in the market now-a-days) says Baba. Instantly Maa replies “eto deri kore bajare gele ki kochi patha boshe thakbe tomar jonne” (you will not get tender mutton if you go so late […]

 
Kolkata Style Mutton Biriyani

Kolkata Style Mutton Biriyani

Maa says, and I believe – “bochor suru jeibhabe korbe, sara bochor seibhabe katbe” (how you start your year defines what you will do the rest of the year). Thus, I am a firm believer of Good Start 🙂 Talking about this, I remember a story and here it goes: I spent my childhood in a small and beautiful town of Assam, Kokrajhar. Back then, New Year was never about cocktails and parties, but all about offering Puja, cooking great food, greeting friends and family and going to picnics. That year, on 31st Dec night, Maa called me and said “kalke sokal sokal uthe phool tulbe, onek phool diye thakur ke pujo dite hobe kalke” (wake up early tomorrow to pluck fresh flowers, I have to offer to God) and I said “thik ache” (alright).

As the first ray of new sun hit the Earth, here I am ready with my flower basket and ran to the garden to pluck flowers for Maa. As I went to the garden I saw Mili Aunty is already there, she greeted me and I greeted her too. In my mind I thought – Mili Aunty cooks awesome Mutton Biriyani. Seeing her the first thing in new year could be a cosmic conspiracy. Does it mean that I am going to eat tasty Mutton Biriyani throughout the year? Probably. I know God is kind 🙂 As I came back with flowers, I was super excited unknown from the fact that a series of surprises awaiting me.

By afternoon as Maa was ready with her new year special dishes, Singh Aunty came with a large vessel and told Maa “Mutton Biriyani baniyechi, apnader jonno ektu diye gelam” (I cooked mutton biriyani, brought some for your family). I was utterly surprised in my mind. Next day, we had a dinner party to attend, second surprise in a row – the menu had Mutton Biriyani in it. That night I told Maa about my “surprise series”. Maa smiled and said “dekhli, Thakur koto bhalo, dara tahole kalke ami Mutton Biriyani banabo tor jonne” (God is kind on you. Wait, tomorrow I will cook Mutton Biriyani for you). And the very next day we had a grand feast with Kolkata Style Mutton Biriyani cooked by Maa. The series of surprises stopped form the next day – days were usual with usual food and fun. Years passed by, life happened and I moved on – all is good with or without Mutton Biriyani surprise. But this dish has an impact on me and with the arrival of every single year I think of two things – “bochor suru jeibhabe korbe, sara bochor seibhabe katbe” and “Mutton Biriyani”.

This time I started my year not with Mili aunty, but with Mutton Biriyani. As I keep my fingers crossed and wait for yet another “surprise series” to start, let me tell you a little bit about the biriyani I cooked. This is the Bengali version of Mutton Biriyani and it contains Alu (potato) and Dim (Egg) and it’s called Kolkata Style Mutton Biriyani. With minimalist spices, this is one of the most savory and delicious one could ever have. Here’s the recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm mutton (biriyani cut)
  • 250 gm long grain basmati rice
  • 2 potatoes, peeled 
  • 2 hard boiled eggs
  • salt (according to taste)
  • 1.5 table-spoon keora water
  • 1 table-spoon rose water
  • 2 cup fried crispy onion

For Marination

  • 4 table-spoon yogurt
  • 1.5 table-spoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon red chilli powder
  • 1 tea-spoon salt
  • 1 table-spoon mustard oil

For Tempering

  • 3 table-spoon ghee
  • 2-3 bay leaves
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 4 green chillies, finely chopped
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch)
  • 4-5 cloves
  • 4-5 cardamom
  • 2 jaiphal
  • 2 star anise

For Boiling Rice

  • 1 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch)
  • 2 cardamom
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tea-spoon salt

Method:

  • Marinate the mutton with all the above mentioned ingredients for 2-3 hours.

  • Meanwhile, wash and soak basmati rice for 1 hour. Drain the water and keep aside.

  • Slit the eggs and shallow fry by adding little turmeric powder and salt. Remove and keep aside.

  • In a vessel, boil water for rice with all the above mentioned ingredients. Once the water reaches boiling point, add the rice and cook till the rice is 3/4th cooked.

  • Once the rice is done, drain the water and keep the rice aside.
  • Meanwhile, heat ghee in a pressure cooker and add all the ingredients mentioned for tempering (except onion and green chilli). Allow them to splutter.

  • Now, add chopped onion and green chillies and sautè until the onion turns light golden in colour.

  • Add the marinated chicken, potato and little salt. Stir until the mutton starts changing colour.

  • Now, add water till half level of the mutton, cover the lid of the pressure cooker. Cook for 5-6 whistles. Turn off the flame and let the pressure cool down completely.

  • Take a separate heavy bottom vessel and create layers for biriyani – one layer of rice followed by one layer of mutton, gravy, 1 potato, 1 egg and fried onion. Again one layer of rice and the process continues.

  • Once all the layers are complete, add keora water and rose water and cover the lid.
  • Cook the whole thing in medium flame for around 15 minutes.
  • Turn off the flame and open the lid to get blasted with the splash of aroma. Your Kolkata Style Mutton Biriyani is ready to be served now.

 

This is a one-pot-meal and can be enjoyed absolutely without anything. If you want you can have salad or raita along with. The Kolkata Style Button Biriyani is different from the usual biriyani and is a marvelous creation of the Nawabi Kitchens of West Bengal.

Do try this and let me know in comments about how you like it. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks. Happy eating and a Happy New Year to you all!

 
Mutton Korma

Mutton Korma

The scope of cooking any korma curry is wide as there are a lot of variations of cooking korma. Kormas are basically vegetable or meat cooked in creamy, spicy and rich gravy. The gravy bases are usually created by adding yogurt, cream, pasted dry fruits […]

 
Mutton Dakbunglow

Mutton Dakbunglow

This is an almost lost recipe believed to have it’s origin in British Colonial kitchens. Dakbunglows are rest houses in British India built for travellers to take rest during their long journey. It is said that the care takers of those houses used to cook […]

 
Biroin Bhat ar Kosha Khashir Mangsho (Sticky Rice & Dry Mutton Curry)

Biroin Bhat ar Kosha Khashir Mangsho (Sticky Rice & Dry Mutton Curry)

This combination is quite nostalgic for me. As a child I grew up having this combination every year during “Poush Sankranti” (Bengali harvest festival celebrated every year in the month of January). Apart from this combination, dry mutton curry and sticky rice individually are very famous among Bengalis, specially Bengalis residing in the North Eastern part of India.

In our house, mutton was kind of “weekend dish” and biroin was must for every occasion happening in the winter season.

Most of the people know about mutton, but “sticky rice” could be a new deal for few. For their information, sticky rice is also know as glutinous rice or sweet rice. It is mainly grown in the Eastern part of Asia and consumed mainly in winter season. It is called sticky rice because the rice becomes sticky when cooked.

Here, I will separately jot down two recipes for two different items. First, let me start with Sticky Rice.

Method:

  • Wash the rice several times till the water is clear.
  • Soak the rice for 5-10 minutes.
  • Heat water in a container and bring it to boil.
  • Once the water is boiled, add rice to it and cover the lid.
  • Cook in full flame for 5 minutes and lower the flame. Cook in low flame for another 15 minutes.
  • Once the rice is cooked, remove the container for the flame, open the lid and tie the mouth of the container with a clean dry cloth.
  • Put the lid over the cloth and keep it in that way for 5-10 minutes.
  • Open the lid and untie the cloth. Your sticky rice is ready to be served now.

Now, when the sticky rice is done, let’s move to Kosha Khashir Mangsho (Dry Mutton Curry.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gms curry cut mutton (with bone)
  • 1 big size onion
  • 1 medium sized tomato
  • 1 tea-spoon lemon juice
  • 4-5 green chillies
  • 1 tea-spoon ginger paste
  • 1 tea-spoon garlic paste
  • 3/4 cup (150 gms approx) full fat sour yogurt
  • 2-3 bay leaves (tej patta)
  • 5-6 cardamom (elaichi)
  • 4-5 cinnamon (dalchini)
  • 5-6 cloves (laung)
  • 2 star anise (chakra phool)
  • 1 nutmeg (javitri)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin powder (jeera)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon coriander powder (dhaniya)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder (haldi)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder for colour
  • 2-3 tablespoon oil (preferable mustard oil)
  • salt (according to taste)

Method:

  • Marinate the mutton with ginger paste, garlic paste, lemon juice, yogurt and little salt for atleast 2 hours.
  • Dry roast the garam masala (cinnamon, cardamom, clove, star anise and nutmeg) in a frying pan till the aroma of the spices starts coming. Make sure the spices don’t get burned. Now, remove the pan and let the spices cool down. Once it’s done, crush the spices (but don’t make powder).
  • Make a paste of onion and green chillies together.
  • Heat oil in a pan and add bay leaves and crushed garam masala. Stir it and add onion and green chiili paste.
  • Once the onion paste turns golden brown, add cumin powder, coriander powder, red chilli powder, Kashmiri chilli powder, turmeric powder and salt. Sprinkle a little water and stir the mixture for 2 minutes.
  • Now, add the marinated mutton and stir until oil starts leaving the mutton.
  • Add 1 cup of hot water and cover the lid. Lower the flame and cook for almost 20-25 minute.
  • Check if the mutton is soft enough. If not, add another 1/2 cup of hot water and cook for another 10 minutes.
  • Once the mutton is soft and tender, remove the lid and stir it in low flame until the water get evaporated and the gravy is dry.
  • Remove it from the flame and serve hot.

You can have Dry Mutton Curry with roti/chapatti or regular steamed rice or naan/kulcha/tandoori roti or with my personal favourite – sticky rice.

Do leave a comment and let me know how you like it. Happy eating!

 
Chanar Daal diye Khashir Mangsho l Dal Gosht (Mutton Cooked with Split Chickpea Lentils)

Chanar Daal diye Khashir Mangsho l Dal Gosht (Mutton Cooked with Split Chickpea Lentils)

This dish is a winner in every sense – be it a special occasion, a celebration, a feast or just your special weekend lunch/dinner. I bet, your family and guests gonna love it. It goes very well with rice and can also be enjoyed with […]