Search Results: fish

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

Rui Mach (Rohu Fish) is probably the only fish that is available in abundance anywhere in India and my Bengali heart thanks the suppliers for that. This is the frequently bought fish in my home and I actually love to cook it in different ways […]

 
Mishti Kumro diye Shidol (Pumpkin with Dry Fermented Fish)

Mishti Kumro diye Shidol (Pumpkin with Dry Fermented Fish)

Ask a Sylheti what is Shidol (dry fermented fish) and he/she will tell you what emotion it actually carries for them. I am a Sylheti by birth, by blood, by heart and by soul. Like many other Sylhetis, my love for Shutki (dry fish) and Shidol […]

 
Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

Aar Macher Jhol (Bengali Style Ayer Fish Curry)

“Mache Bhate Bangali” (Bengalis by fish and rice) is a saying which is as true as “The Sun Rises in the East”. We have a kind of relation with fish which is beyond just loving it for our meals. For us, fish is not only tasty, it’s also sacred. Growing up, fish was a must have during exam times as it’s considered to bring good luck and success. Not only eating, even a sight of a fish just before the exam is considered lucky. As a child, whenever I refused to eat fish Maa said “mach ke na korte pare na” (you should not say no to fish). Also, fish is must in any Bengali wedding. In short, fish brings us good luck and to start anything good, we rely on our very humble fish.

See Other Fish Recipes Here

As I said earlier in my other posts, fish is kind of a regular thing in my home. While Rohu, Telapia or Tengra are some of the fishes that are available easily here, Aar is something which is not very easy to get. Often, the Aar we get here is not very fresh and this is one fish which you cannot and should not compromise with the freshness. Naturally, I avoid buying Aar. Today luck favoured and we got some super fresh Aar in the market and I instantly grabbed 500 gms of it. Happy me on a happy Sunday 🙂

Aar Mach can be cooked in a variety of ways, but one that I love the most is Aar Macher Jhol. This is a super easy and utterly delectable recipe where the humble Aar is cooked with our very mighty potato with a dash of basic spices. It is truly a bliss to have this with gorom bhat (steamed rice). Here I am sharing the recipe with you all and hope you will like it.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm aar mach
  • 1 big sized potato, diced
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1 big sized onion, roughly chopped
  • 5 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 1 table-spoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 1/2 tea-spoon nigella seeds
  • 2 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1 + 1/2 + 1/2)
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon sugar
  • 3 table-spoon mustard oil + as required to fry the fish and potato
  • 2.5 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste
  • a handful chopped coriander leaves

Method:

  • Wash the fish and rub with 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Heat required oil in a pan and shallow fry until light golden. Remove and keep aside.
  • Rub the potato pieces with 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Heat required oil and shallow fry until golden brown. Remove and keep aside.
  • Blend the chopped onion and make a fine paste. Keep aside.
  • Now, heat 3 table-spoon oil and temper with nigella seeds. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add onion paste and ginger-garlic paste and sautè until the mixture changes colour to brownish.
  • Now, add 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder turmeric powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, Kashmiri red chilli powder and salt. Sprinkle some water and stir on medium flame for 2-3 minutes.
  • Add chopped tomato and stir until the tomato gets blended.
  • Now, add water and give a quick mix. Cover and bring it to boil.
  • Add the fried potato and cover the lid. On a medium flame, let it cook for 5 minutes.
  • Open the lid and add fish. Mix well and cover the lid. On a medium flame, let it cook for 10 minutes or until the fish and potato are properly done.
  • Once everything is nicely done, sprinkle the chopped coriander leaves and turn off the flame. If you don’t like coriander leaves, you can substitute with 1/2 tea-spoon garam masala powder.
  • Your “Aar Macher jhol” is ready to be served now.

This dish along with piping hot rice made my Sunday 🙂 Don’t forget to squeeze some lemon juice while eating. Do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

 
Macher Shukto (Bengali Style Mixed Veg with Fish) – Thakurbarir Ranna

Macher Shukto (Bengali Style Mixed Veg with Fish) – Thakurbarir Ranna

This is another delicacy of Jorashako Thakur Bari, the house of Rabindranath Tagore. Also, this is the second recipe of my newly introduced Thakurbarir Ranna series. I proudly and happily can say that I have done a proper justice to this dish and also, given […]

 
Shorshe Tangra (Cat Fish Cooked in Mustard Sauce)

Shorshe Tangra (Cat Fish Cooked in Mustard Sauce)

Shorshe Tangra, also known as Shorshe Tangrar Jhal, is tangra mach (cat fish) cooked in a sauce made of yellow mustard paste. This is one of the most easy yet delectable Bengali style fish curry and absolutely needs no special occasion to be cooked. Like many […]

 
Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Fried Yellow Lentil)

Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Fried Yellow Lentil)

This is Maa‘s absolute favourite recipe. Maa loves moong dal (yellow lentil) and back home, this is the most popular dal that she cooks often. I am not a big fan of moong dal, though, don’t mind having it sometime. Simple and plain moong dal is too boring for me, rather, I like masoor dal that way. I like masoor dal in any form, but, the thing is not same with moong dal. For me to like moong dal, the recipe has to be very interesting. So, this is the recipe that Maa used to cook for me to make me eat moong dal. Now, this is the only moong dal recipe that I cook often in my kitchen and yes, I do love it. Though, I give some twist of my own to make it more interesting and adding coconut is one of them.

See Other Bengali Fish Recipes Here

Moong dal is considered as niramish (vegetarian) dal in Bengalis, whereas, masoor dal is amish (non-vegetarian). Moong dal is usually prepared with no onion and garlic. This recipe that I am going to write today contains fish head, but yet, no onion or garlic are added. Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal is a traditional Bengali dish and is one of the delectable non-veg makeover of this veg dal.

Bengalis cook moong dal in two ways – kancha (raw) and bhaja (fried). While both the forms are super tasty and healthy, bhaja moong has a different aroma and goes very well while cooking with fish. For bhaja moong dal, the lentil is dry roasted before cooking and it’s truly aromatic.

Packed with many amazing health benefits, moong dal is rich in fiber and protein and is excellent for keeping cholesterol under control and thus giving your heart a long life. This lentil also helps to keep the blood sugar level in control and a very rich source of antioxidants. Also, if you are looking for weight loss and healthy skin, moong dal is definitely your thing.

I love fish head and use it often to prepare dishes. I have few recipes of fish head in my blog and you can check them out. Today’s recipe of Macher Matha diye Moong Dal is protein packed, aromatic, healthy and highly delectable. Bongs love this dish and it goes excellent with bhat (rice). Adding coconut to it is my twist and is completely optional, yet, recommended. Here’s the step-by-step recipe for you all.

Ingredients:

  • 1 fish head and 1 tail piece (any fish, I used Rohu)
  • 1 cup moong dal
  • 1/3 cup chopped coconut
  • 5 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 1.5 tea-spoon turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cumin seeds
  • 2 cinnamon stick (each 1 inch)
  • 5 cloves
  • 5 green cardamom 
  • 1 inch ginger (finely chopped)
  • 2 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 2 table-spoon ghee
  • 5 cup water
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Rub the fish head and tail with 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder and salt.
  • Heat oil in a pan and shallow fry the pieces very well. Remove and keep aside.
  • In an separate heavy bottom pan, dry roast the moong dal until aroma starts spreading. Remove and keep aside.

  • In the same pan, dry roast the chopped coconut until it turns little brownish. Remove and keep aside.

  • Now, heat water in the same pan and bring to boil.

  • Meanwhile, wash the roasted moong dal 2-3 time in normal water and make it ready.

  • Once the water is boiled, add moong dal, green chillies, 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and required salt. Cover the lid and lower the flame. Cook for 15-20 minutes.

  • After the stipulated time, open the lid and check the dal. The dal should be cooked and broken by the time. If the find the dal has thickened too much, this is the time when you can add some more water (warm water).

  • Now, add the fish head and tail and mix well. Cover the lid and cook in medium flame for another 10 minutes.

  • You can open the lid in between and bread the head and tail with your spatula into small pieces. I break the tail into small pieces but, prefer not to break the head too much. The choice is yours.
  • After 10 minutes, open the lid and add chopped coconut. Give a quick mix. Cover the lid and cook for another 5 minutes.

  • Turn off the flame and keep the dal aside.
  • In a separate small pan, heat ghee and temper with cumin seeds, ginger, cinnamon, cardamom and cloves. Stir for 1 minute and turn off the flame.

  • Immediately, pour it to the dal and mix well.

  • Cover the dal and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  • Your Macher Matha diye Bhaja Moong Dal is ready to be served now.

Serve it hot with piping hot rice (gorom bhat) and enjoy this Bengali delicacy with your family. This should not go very well with roti/phulka as the dish contains lot of fish bones. As I say always, squeeze a piece of lemon while eating to enhance the taste.

Enjoy this authentic Bengali delicacy and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks. Happy eating!

 
Komola Katla (Catla Fish Cooked in Orange Juice)

Komola Katla (Catla Fish Cooked in Orange Juice)

No love is greater than the love for food and to a Bengali like me, food is synonymous to fish 🙂 Valentine’s Day is here and to celebrate this day of love, I can’t think of anything else than fish. When the world is celebrating […]

 
Macher Matha diye Chanar Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Bengali Split Chickpeas)

Macher Matha diye Chanar Dal (Fish Head Cooked in Bengali Split Chickpeas)

As I always say, I love fish, just like many other Bengalis. We utilize actually the whole of it – from head to tail and even the eggs and other edible parts. Coming to me, more than fish, I love the fish head. But, it […]

 
Muri Ghonto (Bengali Fish Head Curry with Rice)

Muri Ghonto (Bengali Fish Head Curry with Rice)

Back from a long vacation and my mach pagla Bangali mon (fish loving Bengali mind) started craving for some fish, some rice and some spices. As I can’t think of staying away from my kitchen and from fish for so long, a 10 days long vacation without fish is obviously little too much for me 😛 So, today morning I rushed to the local market and bought some fresh Rohu fish. By afternoon, I again wore my apron and entered kitchen like a Knight in Shinning Armour 😀 and then what – I prepared the dish where I could use exactly the three things I was craving for – fish, rice and spices. I prepared the quintessential Bengali mishmash with fish head, rice and spices and we the Bengalis call it “Muri Ghonto”.

The word muri came from Muro, which means Head and Ghonto means a Mishmash Curry. This dish also reminds me of a North Indian friend of mine who asked me once – Tum log machli ka seer bhi khate ho? (you guys eat the fish head also?) and I proudly replied – Seer se leke punch, kuch bhi nehi chorte hum (from head to tail, we don’t spare a single part of it). Bengalis love their fish and eat every part of it – from head to tail and Muri Ghonto is an age old preparation and a hot favourite of every Bengali non-vegetarian kitchen. Usually, it is cooked with the aromatic Gobindobhog rice, but if that is not available you can replace it with Basmati rice as well.

 

Here’s how I cook Muri Ghonto at my kitchen. The recipe is as follows:

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium sized fish head
  • 3/4 cup gobindobhog rice (or basmati rice)
  • 1 big sized potato, diced
  • 1 big sized onion, finely chopped
  • 5-6 green chillies, slit for middle
  • 1 tea-spoon ginger paste
  • 1 tea-spoon garlic paste
  • 2 cinnamon sticks (dalchini)
  • 5-6 green cardamom (elaichi)
  • 5-6 cloves (laung)
  • 2 star anise (chakra phool)
  • 2 bay leaves (tej patta)
  • 2 dried red chillies
  • 1/2 tea-spoon whole cumin seeds (gota jeera/sabud jeera)
  • 2 tea-spoon turmeric powder (haldi)
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder (jeera)
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder (dhaniya)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon red chilli powder (or as per your tolerance)
  • 1 tea-spoon sugar
  • salt (according to taste)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon ghee
  • 4-5 table-spoon mustard oil

Method:

  • Heat a pan and dry roast cinnamon sticks, cardamom, cloves and star anise. Remove from the pan and keep aside.
  • Rub the fish head with 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and some salt. Fry the head properly and keep aside.
  • Rub the potato pieces with 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and some salt. Shallow fry the pieces and keep aside.
  • Heat ghee in a pan and shallow fry the rice adding 2 pinches of turmeric powder for 1 minute. Remove the rice from the pan and keep aside.
  • Heat 3-4 table-spoon oil in a pan and add cumin seeds, roasted spices, dried red chillies and bay leaves. Allow the spices to splutter.
  • Now, add the chopped onion and green chillies. Sautè until the onion turns translucent.
  • Add ginger-garlic paste, cumin powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder and salt and stir for a few seconds on low flame.
  • Now, add the fish head and mix very well with the spices. Cook the head with the spices by stirring constantly until it gets crushed properly.
  • Add the rice and potato and give a quick mix.
  • Now, add 2 cups of warm water, mix well and cover the lid.
  • Cook it on low to medium flame for 10 minutes or until the rice and potato get cooked well. Check the salt, if it is less, you can add now.
  • After 10 minutes, check if it is well cooked. If not, you can add 1 cup warm water more and cook for another 5 minutes.
  • Once the rice is well cooked and the water gets absorbed, add sugar and mix well.
  • Turn off the flame, cover the lid and let it set for 10 minutes. Your Muri Ghonto is ready to be served now.

 

Serve it with hot steamed rice to enjoy a complete authentic Bong meal. While eating, you can add little ghee if you want – this will enhance the taste further, but it is completely optional.

Do try this dish at home and don’t forget to drop me a comment telling how you like it. Happy eating!

 
Sobji diye Macher Tok (Fish with Vegetable & Sour Stew)

Sobji diye Macher Tok (Fish with Vegetable & Sour Stew)

This is a bit experimental dish that I tried out today. Though, Macher Tok is nothing new for Bengalis, infact, it’s a very famous Bengali style fish curry. While making macher tok, what is mostly used is amchur and the preparation is usually without vegetables. […]