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Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

 

 Kajoli Mach, also known as Gangetic Ailia, is a fresh water fish and belongs to the catfish family. This fish is typically available and popular in Indian subcontinent. This fish is relatively small and cooked whole in various delectable forms. Happen to be one of […]

Chhurpi Ko Achar – A Super Tasty Himalayan Side Dish

Chhurpi Ko Achar – A Super Tasty Himalayan Side Dish

 

 Whenever I come back from a holiday, I literally suffer from travel-hangover for a long time. This time the suffering seems to be severe and I know why. The place I have been to is highly intoxicating (in a good way ofcourse). Yes, I am […]

Mishti Kumro diye Shidol (Pumpkin with Dry Fermented Fish)

Mishti Kumro diye Shidol (Pumpkin with Dry Fermented Fish)

 

Ask a Sylheti what is Shidol (dry fermented fish) and he/she will tell you what emotion it actually carries for them. I am a Sylheti by birth, by blood, by heart and by soul. Like many other Sylhetis, my love for Shutki (dry fish) and Shidol knows no bounds. We take so much pride and pleasure in cooking and eating these two things that being deprived from them sometimes mean being deprived from life. While I hail from Silchar (a place in Barak Valley situated in the Northeast India) where Shutki and Shidol are available in abundance, this is not the same case for me now when I stay in South India 🙁 So, whenever I see someone coming from my hometown, the first thing I ask “shidol ancho ni?” (did you bring shidol?). And believe me, this is not the case with me only but with all the Sylhetis staying outside their hometowns.

Wondering who are Sylhetis? Go and check Wikipedia and you will get to know us 🙂 Though, we are much more than what Wiki tells you about us and to know us better, you have to know our Shutki and Shidol first 🙂 In a nutshell, we are the people for whom food is always the priority and can die for that strong smell and spicy aroma of Shidol. While most of the rest of the world cannot stand the smell and taste, we actually don’t care and love it to the core. Apart from Sylhetis, there are many other communities in the Northeastern part of India who relishes Shutki and Shidol just as we do.

Mishti Kumro or I better say Mishti Kumra (as I am a Sylheti) goes extremely well with Shidol and this dish is s star of Sylheti cuisine. Maa cooks it the best and I eat it the best 😀 I blindly followed Maa‘s recipe to prepare this dish. This is one of the many Shidol dishes that we cook, but, definitely one of the most popular ones. Let me quickly explain the recipe to you and I hope you all like it.

Ingredients:

  • 9-10 shidol
  • 300 gm diced pumpkin (the sweeter the better)
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 12-15 garlic cloves, minced
  • 5 green chillies, chopped
  • 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon red chilli powder (adjust according to your tolerance)
  • 3 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 1/2 cup lukewarm water
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Wash the shidol with lukewarm water, remove the head and clean properly. Keep aside.
  • Heat 1 table-spoon oil in a pan and add the pumpkin.
  • Sprinkle a little turmeric powder and salt and mix well. Cover the lid and stir in between. Cook until the pumpkin becomes soft and almost 70% cooked. Remove and keep aside.
  • Heat the remaining oil and add onion and garlic. Sauté until the onion turns golden yellow.
  • Add green chilli and mix well.
  • Now, add the pumpkin, shidol, turmeric powder and salt and mix well.
  • Add water and lower the flame. Cover the lid and cook for 10-15 minutes or until the pumpkin becomes mushy and water evaporates.
  • Once you get the desired consistency, turn off the flame.
  • Your Mishti Kumra/Kumro diye Shidol is ready to be served now.

Serve hot with piping hot rice. You can also have it as side dish with masoor dal and bhaat (red lentil soup and rice). Please note that you should not add any aromatic spice or herb while preparing Shidol as it will suppress the actual aroma of the same.

Enjoy this authentic Sylheti dish and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

 

 Homemade sandesh (fudge) is pure nostalgia. Any festival or any occasion, sandesh is a must almost in every Bengali household. We make variety of sandesh that includes narkoler sandesh (coconut fudge), chhanar sandesh (cottage cheese fudge) and khirer sandesh. Sandesh is not actually something that […]

Radhaballabhi / Radhaballavi (Bengali Style Stuffed Dal Poori)

Radhaballabhi / Radhaballavi (Bengali Style Stuffed Dal Poori)

 

 The best time of the year has arrived and as a Bengali, like many other Bengalis across the world, this is my time to indulge in pet-pujo. For every Bengali, Durga Pujo is not merely associated with prayers and devotion, rather, this is a celebration […]

Cinnamon Spiced Moroccan Chicken

Cinnamon Spiced Moroccan Chicken

 

When the better-half takes over the kitchen, wonder happens. Today’s dish is not mine, it my husband’s. This is his special recipe and the dish has been cooked solely by him from scratch. Yes, I indeed offered help several times, but none of them were granted. My awesome man has done everything by himself and believe me, the kitchen was not at all a mess. Surprised? Don’t be. Yes, guys can cook and can clean up the mess as well. Atleast my guy can 🙂 Unlike all other recipes on my blog, I take no credit of this recipe. This is exclusively his dish, I am just taking the privilege of documenting this awesome recipe. And yes, I took the pictures as well 😀

See Other Chicken Recipes Here

Today is Mahalaya and like many other Bengalis we got up early in the morning, listened to  Birendra Bhadra Chandipath on YouTube and begin our day with full on pujo-pujo mood. The decision of him cooking the Mahalaya special lunch made me really excited. Just after breakfast he bought chicken from the market and entered the kitchen. Until the dish was fully done and he called me to taste, I had no clue on what was going on in the kitchen. But, as I tasted and found it utterly delicious, I decided to make Basanti Pulao to pair with it. The recipe of Basanti Pulao is already there on my blog.

Coming to today’s dish, Cinnamon Spiced Moroccan Chicken, this is traditionally cooked in Moroccan Tajine (clay vessel). We don’t have Tajine and thus cooked the dish in an iron pan. And as we are not bread or naan person, we paired it with Basanti Pulao and it tastes delicious. To satisfy our Bengali taste buds this dish has been made in mustard oil, however, you can replace it with any oil of your choice. Also, this is a very spicy dish, but, you can always adjust the chilli and spices according to your tolerance.

Here’s the recipe for you all and I really hope you all like it.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm chicken (with skin)
  • 2 medium sized onion, finely chopped
  • 7 garlic cloves, minced
  • 8 green chillies, 4 finely chopped and 4 slitted
  • 3 big sized tomato, roughly cut
  • 1 inch cinnamon stick
  • 8 whole black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon cumin powder
  • 1 tablespoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 tablespoon red chilli powder (optional)
  • 1/2 tablespoon turmeric powder
  • 4 tablespoon mustard oil (or any oil)
  • 1 cup warm water
  • sea salt, according to taste

Method:

  • In a grinder, make puree with the tomatoes and keep aside.
  • Grind cinnamon, black pepper and 1 teaspoon sea salt together to fine powder. Divide the powder into two equal halves and keep aside.
  • Wash the chicken and rub with one portion of the cinnamon-pepper-salt powder. Keep aside for 15 minutes.
  • Heat oil in a pan and add the chicken pieces. Fry until the chicken turns golden brown.
  • Once the chicken turns brown, add chopped onion, garlic and chopped green chillies to it and mix very well.
  • On medium flame, stir and cook the chicken for 10 minutes. Keep stirring continuously so that it does not stick to the pan. The skin of the chicken will leave some extra oil.
  • Now, add the tomato puree and the second half of cinnamon-pepper-salt powder. Give a quick mix. Check for salt and if you need some extra salt, add at this stage.
  • Lower the flame and cover the pan. Cook for 5-7 minutes.
  • Open the lid and add slitted green chillies. Mix well.
  • Now, add water and cover the lid once again. Cook for another 10-15 minutes on low flame.
  • Open the lid and your Cinnamon Spiced Moroccan Chicken is ready to be served now.

Serve this super delectable dish with bread or naan or in a Bengali way, with steamed rice or pulao. Squeeze a piece of lime to enhance the taste.

Enjoy this with your loved ones and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating & Shubho Mahalaya to you all!!!

 

Lemon Pepper Chicken – A Versatile & Delicious Chicken Dish

Lemon Pepper Chicken – A Versatile & Delicious Chicken Dish

 

 It was Monday and while I was coping up with my Monday blues, I was feeling lazy too. We both were at home and the better half bought some chicken from the market and demanded to have something which is not usual and not a […]

Bhapa Paneer (Bengali Style Steamed Paneer)

Bhapa Paneer (Bengali Style Steamed Paneer)

 

 Paneer or Cottage Cheese is made by curdling milk – either you do it by adding lemon juice/vinegar or sometimes, some cooking malfunction can do it for you. Paneer is also called as Chhana in Bengali and is often made at home. We the Bengalis prepare […]

Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

Niramish Mangsho / Bengali Bhoger Mangsho (No Onion No Garlic Bengali Mutton Curry)

 

With the advent of festive season many new flowers bloom, many new crops grow, our hearts deck up with new hopes and dreams and not to mention our kitchens – they just keep of spreading new aromas. There are actually some dishes which we specifically chose to prepare during festival times or they are kind of mandatory with festivals knocking at the door. Niramish Mangsho aka Bhoger Mangsho is one such dish for me that I love to cook at this time of the year.

See Other Mutton Recipes Here

Mangsho (here, not chicken, but mutton) is specifically cooked with onion, garlic and lot of spices. But this Bengali Niramish Mangsho is different. Niramish means vegetarian in Bengali and this mutton curry is considered to be vegetarian as it does not contain onion and garlic. Surprised? Yes, this is how Bengali food logic works. Typically prepared to offer Goddess Kali, this mutton curry is a quintessential Bengali delicacy and is made absolutely without onion and garlic. Also, the use of spices are kept minimum and the taste enhancement completely depends on “getting maximum out of minimum” skill and ofcourse the devotion of the person who is making it.

Earlier, when boli (animal sacrifice) was legalized, people used to prepare this curry with the meat of the lamb/sheep that had been sacrificed to Goddess Kali. Now, when boli ritual is almost a history, people still purchase mutton (yes, from the market) to make this special mutton curry and to offer it to the Goddess. The food that we offer to God is called Bhog and thus another name of this curry came into being, Bhoger Mangsho.

Niramish Mangsho is such a dish which is typically not prepared in many households, rather, it is the thing of parar barowari puja (refers to such pujas where a large number of people gathers together to organise a puja). However, it also gets prepared in barir puja (a family organised puja). Apart from cooking this heavenly tasty curry only for Goddess, we the Bengalis also love to prepare this sometime just like that, for our family. I am one such Bengali who love to cook this mangsho sometime and my favourite time to cook it is this time of the year.

Niramish Mangsho was on last Sunday afternoon menu and my family loved it. The tender pieces of mutton cooked in ghee and a dash of gobindobhog rice (a special Bengali aromatic rice) paste – this curry is a blast of flavour and aroma. Let’s have a look at its recipe. I am sure you are going to fall in love with this mutton curry.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gm curry cut mutton
  • 2 potato, largely diced 
  • 3-4 tablespoon gobindobhog rice
  • 3 tablespoon mustard oil
  • 4 table-spoon ghee
  • 1 tablespoon garam masala powder
  • 3 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste

For Marination:

  • 3/4 cup yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon red chilli powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 tablespoon ginger paste
  • 1 tablespoon green chilli paste (adjust as per your tolerance)
  • 1 tablespoon mustard oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt

For Tempering:

  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 inch)
  • 1 black cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seed
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seed

Method:

  • Wash and marinate the mutton pieces for 2 hours with all the ingredients mentioned in For Marination section.
  • Soak the gobindobhog rice for 1 hour in water and then make a fine paste of it. Keep aside.
  • Heat mustard oil in a pan and shallow fry the potato adding little turmeric powder and salt. Remove and keep aside.
  • Now, heat ghee and temper with all the ingredients mentioned in For Tempering section. Allow them to splutter.
  • Add the marinated mutton and stir in medium flame until the ghee starts separating.
  • Add fried potato and required salt and give a quick mix.
  • Now, add water and mix well. Cover the lid and cook for around 30-40 minutes in low to medium flame. Stir in between if required. If using a pressure cooker, cook for 6 whistles and turn off the flame. Let the pressure cool down naturally.
  • Open the lid and check if the mutton is properly cooked. If not, cover and cook for some more time.
  • Once the mutton is nicely done, add gobindobhog rice paste and mix very well. Cover the lid and cook for another 5 minutes in low flame.
  • Open the lid and add garam masala powder. Give a quick mix.
  • Your Niramish Mangsho aka Bhoger Mangsho is ready to be served now.

Serve this dish with gorom bhat (piping hot rice) and yes, don’t forget a squeeze a piece of lemon before you eat. This Niramish Mangsho is a sure shot heat winning recipe and you must give it a try.

Enjoy this delicious mutton curry and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating and Happy Festivity to you all!!!

Bhuna Mangsho / Bhuna Mutton – Eid Special Mutton Recipe

Bhuna Mangsho / Bhuna Mutton – Eid Special Mutton Recipe

 

 Bakra Eid is round the corner and my house is all decked up in celebration colour and mood. Mr. Husband is super excited and thus the celebration has already started almost one week prior Eid. While many non-veg dishes are in my bucket list for […]