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Lobongo Lotika Pitha

Lobongo Lotika Pitha

 

 Well, this pitha has a special place in my heart. Among all the things I learned from Pishimoni, this is probably the very first one. As I said time and again that my Pishimoni was a gifted cook. Instead of terming her mere cook, I […]

Bhapa Puli Pitha / Sheddho Puli (Steamed Stuffed Rice Flour Dumpling)

Bhapa Puli Pitha / Sheddho Puli (Steamed Stuffed Rice Flour Dumpling)

 

 With the advent of Makar Sankranti comes the season of pitha-puli. The festival of harvest always calls for grand celebrations. From sweets to savory dishes, from veg to non-veg dishes – this time of the year is to eat. No calorie count, no guilt in […]

Gajorer Halua / Gajar Ka Halwa (Indian Style Carrot Pudding)

Gajorer Halua / Gajar Ka Halwa (Indian Style Carrot Pudding)

 

Indian Style Carrot Pudding aka Gajar Ka Halwa (also called Gajorer Halua in Bengali) is a super popular Indian dessert and almost relished by everyone during the winters. At this time of the year carrots are available in abundance and thus this is an apt season for this creamy yummy halwa. Slow cooked in full fat milk by adding dry fruits and flavoured with cardamom, this dish always stands apart from the crowd and is one of the stars of Indian desserts.

See Other Sweet & Dessert Recipes Here

Typically considered to be a North-Indian dessert, Gajar Ka Halwa has its devotees in other regions as well and Bengalis are no exception. I love Gajar Ka Halwa but obviously it comes after my Nolen Gurer Payesh and Rosogolla, but nevertheless, I love it ūüôā More than me, Sam is a big fan of this dessert and unlike me, he wants it after every meal whenever I make it.

Gajar Ka Halwa can be made with khoya, milk or condensed milk but Maa‘s version is always with milk and I do the same. Maa got the perfection from Singh Aunty. She is from Bihar and happen to be our neighbor during our stay in Kokrajhar. I was just a kid than and used to be a big fan of Singh Aunty‘s desserts and pickles. As Maa learned from her, I eventually ended up learning the same from Maa and here’s how I make it.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cup grated carrot (approx 500 gm)
  • 500 ml full fat milk
  • 1/2 tea-spoon cardamom powder
  • 1/2 cup crushed dry fruits (almond & cashew nut)
  • 1 cup sugar (adjust according to your taste)
  • 4 table-spoon ghee

Method:

  • Heat ghee in a pan and over low flame, shallow fry the grated carrot for 3-4 minutes.
  • Add milk and dry fruits to the same and give a quick mix. Simmer and cook the carrot in milk for atleast 30 minute.
  • When the milk is almost half, add sugar and cardamom powder and mix well.
  • Cook for another 15 minutes or until the milk get fully fried up and the halwa starts taking the shape of a dough.
  • Turn off the flame and serve hot or bring drown to the room temperature, refrigerate and serve chilled.

If you want you can also serve Gajar Ka Halwa with Luchi/Poori – the choice is yours. It is absolutely delectable in whatever way you serve it.

Enjoy this absolutely stunning Indian dessert with your love ones and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

Goalondo Steamer Curry or Steamer Fowl Curry

Goalondo Steamer Curry or Steamer Fowl Curry

 

  Having my roots in Sylhet (now in Bangladesh) of Undivided India, I take pride and feel so much fascinated by the story of those boatmen, who, probably sylhetis, used to sing those Bhatiyali songs and cook their daily food completely ignorant about the fact […]

Rum-Dry Fruit Mini Muffins

Rum-Dry Fruit Mini Muffins

 

  Red is the theme of the season and Rum is the warmth of the same. Traditional Rich Fruitcake aka Christmas Cake is a must-bake at this time of the year and I, being no exception, do the same every year without miss. This year, […]

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

Rui Macher Rosha (Rohu Fish Spicy Curry)

 

Rui Mach (Rohu Fish) is probably the only fish that is available in abundance anywhere in India and my Bengali heart thanks the suppliers for that. This is the frequently bought fish in my home and I actually love to cook it in different ways and don’t usually repeat one recipe twice in a month. Be it a rich and spicy preparation or a simple runny gravy, Rui Mach tastes delicious in every way and thus, it is one of the most versatile fish used in Bengali non-vegetarian cuisine.

See Other Fish Recipes Here

Rui Macher Rosha is also called as Biye Barir Rui Mach by many as it is spicy, rich and has a thick gravy. Nevertheless, whatever the form or name is, I love Rui Mach. The term ‘Rosha’ refers to something that has a thick gravy base, but, this is not Kalia though. Rosha can be prepared with a variety of fishes like Rui, Katla, Aar and many such freshwater fishes. Back home, Maa usually used to prepare all the simple Rui Mach¬†dishes and the most common was Alu diye patla Jhol (runny curry with potato), and in winters, alu used to accompany with fulkopi (cauliflower). Rosha used to be a luxury that we used to enjoy either on Sundays or in any special days.

Both Baba and I are a fan of spicy fish curries and now, I can see that my husband has the similar taste buds. In my kitchen, Rosha does not need a special day to appear. For my husband, Rosha and Kalia are the two most desired fish preparations. The most fun part of these special dishes are, they look and taste rich and royal but, they are actually simple and super easy to prepare. Simplicity has it’s own charm and that is, probably, the main mantra of Bengali cuisine.

Rui Macher Rosha has a thick tomato based gravy and the below mentioned ingredients will give you a dish for two. As I have a small family of only two, I usually prepare accordingly and the measurements are apt if you have a super small family like me. If not, you can always increase the quantity and adjust the ingredients accordingly. Here’s how I prepare my Rui Macher Rosha.

Ingredients:

  • 4 pieces of Rui Mach (Rohu Fish)
  • 1 big sized onion, chopped
  • 1 big sized tomato, roughly chopped
  • 4 green chillies, slitted from middle
  • 1.5 table spoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 dry red chillies
  • 1 tea-spoon turmeric powder (1/2 + 1/2)
  • 1 tea-spoon cumin powder
  • 1 tea-spoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon red chilli powder (optional)
  • 1/2 tea-spoon Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 6 table-spoon mustard oil (3 + 3)
  • 3/4 cup warm water
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Rub the fish pieces with 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder and little salt. Keep aside.
  • Grind the tomato to make puree. Keep aside.
  • Heat 3 table-spoon oil in a pan and shallow fry the fish pieces one by one. Remove from the pan and keep aside.
  • Heat the remaining oil in the same pan and temper with bay leaves and dry red chillies. Allow to splutter.
  • Now, add onion and saut√©¬†until the it turns light brownish.
  • Add ginger-garlic paste and stir until the raw smell of ginger and garlic completely goes.
  • Add the remaining turmeric powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, red chilli powder and Kashmiri red chilli powder and sprinkle some water. Stir on low flame for 1 minute.
  • Now, add the tomato puree and green chillies. Stir on low flame for 3 minutes.
  • Add warm water and salt and give a quick mix. Cover and cook the mixture on medium flame for 3-4 minutes.
  • Open the lid and add the fish pieces one by one. Gently give a mix and cover the lid again.
  • Cook on low to medium flame for 7-10 minutes and turn off the flame. Do not overcook.
  • Your Rui Macher Rosha is ready to be served now.

Serve with hot steamed rice and don’t forget to squeeze a piece of lemon while eating. Rich to the taste buds and light to the stomach, this dish will never fail to impress you ūüôā

Enjoy this authentic Bengali fish curry and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

Kajoli Macher Jhaal (Gangetic Ailia in Mustard Gravy)

 

  Kajoli Mach, also known as Gangetic Ailia, is a fresh water fish and belongs to the catfish family. This fish is typically available and popular in Indian subcontinent. This fish is relatively small and cooked whole in various delectable forms. Happen to be one […]

Chhurpi Ko Achar – A Super Tasty Himalayan Side Dish

Chhurpi Ko Achar – A Super Tasty Himalayan Side Dish

 

  Whenever I come back from a holiday, I literally suffer from travel-hangover for a long time. This time the suffering seems to be severe and I know why. The place I have been to is highly intoxicating (in a good way ofcourse). Yes, I […]

Mishti Kumro diye Shidol (Pumpkin with Dry Fermented Fish)

Mishti Kumro diye Shidol (Pumpkin with Dry Fermented Fish)

 

Ask a¬†Sylheti what is Shidol (dry fermented fish) and he/she will tell you what emotion it actually carries for them. I am a Sylheti by birth, by blood, by heart and by soul. Like many other Sylhetis, my love for Shutki (dry fish) and Shidol knows no bounds. We take so much pride and pleasure in cooking and eating these two things that being deprived from them sometimes mean being deprived from life. While I hail from Silchar¬†(a place in Barak Valley situated in the Northeast India) where Shutki and Shidol are available in abundance, this is not the same case for me now when I stay in South India ūüôĀ So, whenever I see someone coming from my hometown, the first thing I ask “shidol ancho ni?” (did you bring shidol?). And believe me, this is not the case with me only but with all the Sylhetis staying outside their hometowns.

Wondering who are Sylhetis? Go and check Wikipedia and you will get to know us ūüôā Though, we are much more than what Wiki tells you about us and to know us better, you have to know our Shutki and Shidol first ūüôā In a nutshell, we are the people for whom food is always the priority and can die for that strong smell and spicy aroma of Shidol. While most of the rest of the world cannot stand the smell and taste, we actually don’t care and love it to the core. Apart from Sylhetis, there are many other communities in the Northeastern part of India who relishes Shutki and Shidol just as we do.

Mishti Kumro or I better say Mishti Kumra (as I am a Sylheti) goes extremely well with Shidol and this dish is s star of Sylheti cuisine. Maa cooks it the best and I eat it the best ūüėÄ I blindly followed Maa‘s recipe to prepare this dish. This is one of the many Shidol dishes that we cook, but, definitely one of the most popular ones. Let me quickly explain the recipe to you and I hope you all like it.

Ingredients:

  • 9-10 shidol
  • 300 gm diced pumpkin (the sweeter the better)
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 12-15 garlic cloves, minced
  • 5 green chillies, chopped
  • 1/2 tea-spoon turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tea-spoon red chilli powder (adjust according to your tolerance)
  • 3 table-spoon mustard oil
  • 1/2 cup lukewarm water
  • salt, according to taste

Method:

  • Wash the shidol with lukewarm water, remove the head and clean properly. Keep aside.
  • Heat 1 table-spoon oil in a pan and add the pumpkin.
  • Sprinkle a little turmeric powder and salt and mix well. Cover the lid and stir in between. Cook until the pumpkin becomes soft and almost 70% cooked. Remove and keep aside.
  • Heat the remaining oil and add onion and garlic. Saut√©¬†until the onion turns golden yellow.
  • Add green chilli and mix well.
  • Now, add the pumpkin, shidol, turmeric powder and salt and mix well.
  • Add water and lower the flame. Cover the lid and cook for 10-15 minutes or until the pumpkin becomes mushy and water evaporates.
  • Once you get the desired consistency, turn off the flame.
  • Your Mishti Kumra/Kumro diye Shidol is ready to be served now.

Serve hot with piping hot rice. You can also have it as side dish with masoor dal and bhaat (red lentil soup and rice). Please note that you should not add any aromatic spice or herb while preparing Shidol as it will suppress the actual aroma of the same.

Enjoy this authentic Sylheti dish and do drop me a comment giving your feedback about this recipe. You can also tag me on Instagram using the handle @when_a_bong_cooks.

Happy Eating!!!

Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

Khirer Sandesh (Bengali Reduced Milk Fudge) – A Traditional Bengali Sweet

 

  Homemade sandesh (fudge) is pure nostalgia. Any festival or any occasion, sandesh is a must almost in every Bengali household. We make variety of sandesh that includes narkoler sandesh (coconut fudge), chhanar sandesh (cottage cheese fudge) and khirer sandesh. Sandesh is not actually something […]